CANADA IMMIGRATION INTERVIEW MORE THAN 100 SAMPLE QUESTIONS WHICH IS GENERALLY ASKED UNDER VARIOUS CATEGORIES BY VISA OFFICER

CANADA IMMIGRATION INTERVIEW MORE THAN 100 SAMPLE QUESTIONS WHICH IS GENERALLY ASKED UNDER VARIOUS CATEGORIES BY VISA OFFICER

Surviving the immigration interview, prep for these questions as generally asked –

Category 1:

About You and Your Family

1. Tell us a little about yourself. / Could you tell me about yourself. Schooling / lifestyle..??
2. Give us some information about your Origin/ Family background/ Ethnicity?
3. Please describe your typical workday?
4. What do you like doing in your spare time ?
5. Where do you live?
6. Do you own a house, or do you rent? Or is it company provided?
7. (If you have children under 18) Where are your children now? Are they alone at home? (Note: In Canada, it is illegal to leave children under 12 unattended).
8. Do your parents live in the same home?
9. Do you plan to bring them to Canada if your application is approved?
10. If not, who will look after them if you move to Canada?
11. What’s your current status – single/married/engaged?
12. Where does you spouse / Fiance’s parents live ?
13. How long have you been married? OR When do you plan to marry?
14. What’s the name and D.O.B of your spouse?
15. Have you been previously married?
16. Do you have other children not listed in this application?
17. How would you rate your English language skills? How about French? (Note: Expect to be tested on this if you claim some degree of skills).
18. Tell us where you think you are Excellent, Good, bad or Worst in
Reading Writing Speaking Listening
19. How well do your spouse and children speak English/French?
20. Have you ever been in trouble with the law? Were you ever reported/charged/arrested for any crime?
21. Do your spouse and children support your plan to move to Canada?
22. Do you have family in Canada?
23. What would you do if your immigration application is rejected? Or What is your plan if you are unsuccessful in this Interview and is not given a Landing Visa?

Category 2: Job and Qualifications
1. What is Your profession?
2. Where are you working now? Or What do you currently do?
Name Address Contact details of Employer

3. Can you give us the name of your supervisor / Person you are reporting to / Your Immediate manager?
Name Title/Designation Address & Contact details

4. What is your title?
5. What does your job involve?
6. Is this a full time or part time job?
7. How long have you worked at this company?
8. Have you had the same position since you started?
9. What jobs have you had prior to this?
10. Can you provide references?
Name Address Contact details of Previous Employer

10-b Details of Previous managers/ supervisors
Name Title/Designation Address & Contact details

11. Why you quit those jobs and why you are going to quit this current one and move to Canada?
12. Tell us about your educational background.
13. What qualifications do you have for your present job?
14. Were you trained before taking on this role?
15. How many people work in your department/company? How many work under you?
16. Who do you report to in the company? Could you give us their contact information?
17. What are you currently working on?
18. Would you say you are doing well in this company?
19. Why would you want to quit this job and head for an uncertain future in Canada?
20. Do you think you will easily find a similar job in Canada?
21. Do you think your qualifications are sufficient to help you find a job?
22. How can your current job help you get a similar job in Canada?
23. How can your current job help you to Integrate in Canadian Society?
24. Do you plan to study further in Canada?
25. Will you undergo a training/ upgrade your skills or go for an internship before taking up a job?
26. Have you had your qualifications assessed in Canada?

Category 3: Financial Position

1. What is your Financial position?
2. What is your current source of Funds? Have you got any Business or just a job ?
3. How much money do you earn at your present job?
4. Do you have any other sources of income? How much do you earn from those?
5. How much money do you have in the banks?
6. Can you provide bank statements for the last 1/2/3 years?
7. What other assets do you have? Property? Stocks and bonds? Gold?
8. What are your assets worth, approximately, at today’s market rates? Do you have an assessment report?
9. If your immigration application were to be approved, would you sell your assets before moving to Canada?

Category 4: What You Know About Canada
1. How much do you know about Canada?
2. What exactly have you heard about Canada?
3. What do you expect Canada to be like?
4. Who is Canada’s Prime Minister?
5. What is the capital of Canada?
6. How many Canadian Provinces can you name?
7. Can you name some Canadian cities
Or Could you give me the name of 3 Canadian cities and 3 Canadian Provinces ?
8. What is the name of the premier of the province where you plan to settle?

Category 5: Immigrating to Canada1. Why do you want to leave your country?
2. Why do you want to come to Canada?
3. Are you prepared for the challenges that come with a move to a new country?
4. Why did you choose Canada? Why not Australia, New Zealand, the US or Britain? Or Is there any specific reason for choosing Canada as your residency country ?
5. Where in Canada would you like to Settle ? and Why?
6. What are your preparations for leaving your country?
a. Would you sell all of your equity/assets?
b. b. Any emotional and/or psychological preparation associated with leaving your country.
c. How do you think your spouse and kids [family] will cope with emotional and psychological stress associated with leaving their friends and relatives?
7. What do you expect Canada to be like?
8. Which city in Canada do you want to go to? Why did you decide on that city?
9. Do you have family/friends in Canada? If so, where do they live?
10. (If your intended destination is different from the one you have family in) Why did you choose City X rather than City Y if that’s where you have family?
11. Will you change your mind and settle in City Y if your application is approved?
12. Will your relatives/friends assist you after you move to Canada?
13. How do you plan to connect with your relatives/friends in you live in different cities?
14. How will you support yourself and your family before you get a job?
15. How are you preparing yourself and your family for Canada?
a. Do all of your family members know English?
b. If no, how do you think they will adapt to a new culture and environment suddenly?
16. How much money do you plan to take with you to Canada?
17. How long do you think your funds will last you if you haven’t found a job?
18. Have you found out about the cost of living in your intended destination?
19. Explain how you plan to find a job in Canada.
20. Will you be using the Internet for your job search? Will it be the only source for job hunt ?
21. What other means would you use to find a job?
22. There are so many job-seekers in Canada who are familiar with current industry practices. Why do you believe you can get the job ahead of them?
23. Have you been in touch with prospective employers in Canada with regard to your job search?
24. Do you know of any associations or licensing bodies related to your profession in Canada?
25. Have you attempted to contact them? If yes, what did they say? Will they Grant you Membership?
26. What do you know about your profession in Canada ?
27. What would you do if you cannot find a job in your field? Are Unable to secure Employment ?
28. Would you seek government unemployment benefits while you are unemployed?
29. Would you return to your home country if you can’t find a job in your choosen Fileld?
30. Where do you see yourself five or 10 years from now?
31. Have you ever been arrested, charged or convicted of any violation of the law?
a. If yes,
i. Include felonies and misdemeanors, but not traffic violations.
ii. Provide all the details, your details include but not limited to

1. Felony

2. Sentence/fine

3. When happened

4. When was the sentence served or fine paid

25. Do you have any criminal record?

a. If yes,

i. Provide details of what the charge was, sentence served, and why you were charged.

Some tips for the prospective applicants appearing for interview.
– Carry along with you the xerox copies of the initial application filled by you.
– Carry original of all your educational certificates and job offer/contract letters mentioned in the application.
– English language test results copy.
– Passport
– You may be asked questions about your field of study.
– Your present job responsibilties and other details to ascertain you can settle down in canada under your job category.
– Before the interview date do some research about the city where there is maximum demand for your trade.
-Be cool and don’t bluff. Speak the truth

With this info in mind, you can be positive that your interview goes well and if it does you are usually handed over visa approval instantly or your passwords will be deposited to be released later on approval.

http://www.facebook.com/indozoverseas

call Ayushi @ 7696765383

AUSTRALIA THREE STPES TO CHECK VISA DETAILS AND CONDITIONS ATTACHED WITH IT ONLINE

How to view your visa details and conditions online

As a visa holder you can view your visa details and conditions online at any time. The instructions below will help you to understand how to view your visa status and entitlements.

Visit the Visa Entitlement Verification Online (VEVO) homepage.
Click on the ‘Check your own visa details with VEVO’ button. The visa holder enquiry screen will be displayed.

Figure 1 – Step 2: Visa holder enquiry screen.

Enter your ‘Transaction Reference Number (TRN)’, ‘Visa Grant Number’, ‘Visa Evidence Number’ or ‘password’ into the ‘Reference type’ field.
TRN – is provided to you if you apply for your visa online. If you lodged your application through ImmiAccount, you can also find your TRN there.
Note: All visa holders included in the online visa application can use the TRN and see the full details of the individual visa holder.
Visa Evidence Number – is recorded on your visa label, if you have obtained one. Australia offers electronic visas, meaning a label is not necessary

Figure 2 – Step 3: Visa label.
Visa Grant Number – is provided to you on the notification you receive advising you are successful in your visa application.

Figure 3 – Step 3: Visa Grant Number.
Password – is obtained from us. A password can only be obtained once you are in Australia by contacting our General Enquiries Line.
Enter your ‘date of birth’, ‘passport or ImmiCard number’ and ‘country of passport or ImmiCard’ into the required fields.
Read the terms and conditions and if you agree to them, click in the ‘tick box’ to accept them.
If you have entered incorrect details, click ‘Clear’ to start again.
If your details are correct, click ‘Submit’.
visa details and conditions
You can then choose to print, save or email a copy of your VEVO return.

 

 

AUSTRALIA GUIDE FOR FOREIGN DENTISTS TO PRACTICE IN THE COUNTRY

AUSTRALIA GUIDE FOR FOREIGN DENTISTS TO PRACTICE IN THE COUNTRY

You can apply for general registration as a dentist in Australia, if you meet the following requirements which are mandated by the Dental Board of Australia (DBA) and implemented by the Dental Council of Australia (ADC);

If you are registered to practise in New Zealand, you can apply under the Trans-Tasman Mutual Recognition Arrangement (this applies irrespective of the country in which you studied)
If you obtained your qualifications in the UK, Republic of Ireland or New Zealand at any one of the approved universities your qualifications are deemed to be equivalent to those in Australia and you can apply for registration
If you are from Canada, and have either (1) qualifications certified by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of Canada or (2) have been eligible for registration in Canada by successfully completing an exam administered by the National Dental Examining Board of Canada
If you don’t have the required qualifications, you can either:
Complete an approved Australian-based qualification or
You can undertake the exam procedure overseen by the ADC.

The ADC will initially assess your documentation to determine whether your qualifications meet the criteria for immediate registration or not; if they don’t, you may be required to sit both a written and practical examination.

You are eligible to undergo the examination procedure if you have completed at least four years of full-time academic study at an approved university or an approved qualification and you have been continuously registered in either your home country or the country in which you studied.

You will also be required to sit a proficiency in English test and undergo a criminal history check.

There are also Limited Registration categories in the public sector available for dentists with overseas qualifications working towards a general registration.

For detailed information on general registration requirements for dentists with overseas qualifications, visit the Dental Board of Australia.

For information on the assessment process, visit the Australian Dental Council.

If you are a dentist with overseas qualifications who would like to have exposure to the practise of Australian dentistry, either for the purpose of moving here, or simply to extend your body of knowledge or network with Australian colleagues, you can apply to be an Associate Member of the ADA.

www.ada.org.au

New study reveals most in-demand occupations in Canada in 2018

New study reveals most in-demand occupations in Canada in 2018 Coding skills especially sought after by Canadian IT employers

A new study detailing the most in-demand occupations in Canada in 2018 shows business analysts, IT project managers and software engineers among the top 10.

The annual study by the human resources company Randstad Canada showed business analysts in fifth place, IT project managers in seventh place and software engineers ranking ninth overall.

The study looked at job openings, job placements and other data from various Canadian markets that were collected and compiled by Randstad Canada and business research consultants CEB/Gartner.

“Tech continues to be one of Canada’s best job sectors, rapidly adding new jobs for developers and analysts of all kinds,” the study says.

The findings were published on the eve of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau first visit to San Francisco, where he pitched Canada as a destination for U.S. tech companies.

Trudeau and the Canadian government are working to capitalize on the uncertainty among tech companies and skilled foreign tech workers in the United States caused by President Donald Trump’s hard-line policies on immigration and trade.

Find out if you are eligible for Canadian Immigration by filling out our FREE online assessment form.

Coding skills “intensely in demand”

Drilling down into its IT-sector findings, the study says developers “with knowledge of both front and back-end coding are intensely in demand,” especially full stack developers. Java remained the top developer skill, with SQL in second. Python and .net are also considered in-demand.

The study listed the top 8 tech-sector jobs as:

  1. Project manager
  2. Software engineer
  3. Web developer
  4. Program analyst
  5. Java developer

Randstad says Canada’s IT sector employs 488,000 professionals and added 11,500 new jobs in 2017. Nearly 50 per cent of those jobs (5,000) were created in Toronto and 2,000 were created in Montreal.

Targeted IT immigration programs

The demand for workers with tech expertise has led Canada and a number of its provinces to implement targeted immigration programs designed to facilitate their entry into the country.

The federal government’s Global Talent Stream was created last year to expedite the processing of work permits for highly skilled workers in a number of tech occupations.

At the provincial level, British Columbia holds weekly draws for tech workers with a job offer through its Tech Pilot program and Ontario has conducted tech-specific searches of the federal Express Entry pool through its Human Capital Priorities Stream.

Tech jobs also figure prominently among the in-demand occupations in provinces such as Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

General labourers top overall list

In terms of Randstad’s overall list of in-demand jobs in Canada, general labourers led the top 10, with sales representatives and accountants rounding out the top three.

The top 10 jobs were as follows:

  1. General labourer
  2. Sales representative
  3. Accountant
  4. Engineering project manager
  5. Business analyst
  6. Customer service rep
  7. IT project manager
  8. Account manager
  9. Software engineer
  10. Forklift operator

Canada to commit $440 million for immigration increase over next 3 years

Canada’s Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen says the federal government’s multi-year immigration levels plan is on track and $440 million will be committed to ensure its success.

Hussen provided an update Thursday on Canada’s 2018 immigration levels before Parliament’s Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration.

Last November, Canada put aside one-year immigration levels planning in favour of a three-year plan covering 2018 to 2020. The plan calls for a gradual increase in immigration levels over that time, from an overall admissions target of 310,000 in 2018 to 340,000 in 2020.

Hussen said Canada’s new multi-year targets represent the highest admissions in more than 100 years and the highest percentage of immigration in more than 40 years.

Sixty per cent of this growth will come through Canada’s economic immigration programs, Hussen said, singling out the vital roles of the federal Express Entry system and Canada’s Provincial Nominee Programs, or PNPs.

“The number of skilled immigrants we select through our Express Entry system will grow over this time frame, which will mean more highly skilled talent for our labour market,” he said.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has set a target of 242,100 new admissions between 2018 and 2020 through the three economic immigration programs managed through the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

Express Entry target admissions

Year Target Target Increase
2017 71,700*
2018 74,900 3,200 (4%)
2019 81,400 6,700 (9%)
2020 85,800 4,400 (5%)

As to PNPs, which allow Canada’s provinces and territories to nominate a set number of immigrants each year for permanent residence, Hussen said these programs were a key driver for the multi-year level plan.

Express Entry candidates with a provincial nomination receive an additional 600 points toward their Comprehensive Ranking System score, leaving them well-positioned to receive an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence from IRCC.

“Provincial economies are doing very well and they had asked us to help them meet the soaring demand for workers and for skilled labour,” Hussen said. “They’ve constantly been asking for increases and you see an increase every single year as part of the three-year plan.”

IRCC has set admission targets through PNPs that will increase by a total of 23 per cent over those three years.

Better planning

Hussen said the multi-year approach also allows the government and partner organizations to better prepare for increases to ensure they have the capacity to welcome and successfully integrate newcomers into Canadian society.

“Instead of planning admissions one year at a time, as has been the norm for the last 15 years, planning admissions over three years will ensure that the government and our service provider partners are in a better position to plan for newcomer-specific settlement needs,” he said.

The increased admission targets under the multi-year levels plan are projected to cost $440 million over the next three years.

The minister said these additional resources will be used to address the increased demands placed on IRCC’s global processing network and its settlement programs. The additional funding will also enable IRCC and its partners to process and screen more applications for permanent residency in a timely manner.

“We expect that higher immigration levels will allow us to improve the operations of our immigration system, help us to reduce our application backlogs and improve processing times for our clients,” he said, adding that the increased levels in certain categories will create more admission spaces and allow IRCC to process more applications each year.

“In particular, we expect to see real progress in reducing processing times in family, caregiver and refugee programs,” Hussen said. “Faster processing also ensures that employers can more effectively get the talent they need.”

The day before Hussen’s standing committee update, he announced that the government had met its promised 12-month deadline to reduce the backlog of Spousal Sponsorship applications by 80 per cent.

Immigration essential to Canada’s future

The Immigration Minister said the government’s immigration objectives are supported by independent studies by organizations like the Conference Board of Canada, which late last year reported that Canada will need to increase immigration levels to around one per cent of Canada’s population over the next two decades in order to sustain a healthy level of economic growth across the country.

Under the multi-year levels plan, immigration will represent 0.9 per cent of Canada’s population by 2020, Hussen said.

Pointing to the diminishing ratio of workers to aging Canadians over the last 47 years, Hussen said all Canadians have a vested interest in increased immigration levels.

“In 1971, there were 6.6 people of working age for each senior; by 2012, the worker to retiree ratio was 4.2: 1,” Hussen said. “Projections put the ratio at 2:1 by 2036 — less than 20 years from now. That’s when 5.5 million Canadians are expected to retire and almost 100 per cent of Canada’s net population growth will be through immigration.”

Immigration already accounts for 65 per cent of net population growth in Canada and immigrants now constitute 25 per cent of Canada’s workforce, Hussen said.

Canada’s demographic challenges necessitate enhanced efforts to attract immigrants with the skills Canada needs in order to grow the size of its labour force and Canada’s economy, and maintain national social programs, Hussen said.

“Immigration will also help to support our much-cherished public health care system, public pensions and other social programs in the decades to come,” he said.

“Immigration represents a major investment in our country’s prosperity… it will benefit all Canadians now and into the future.”

CANADA GUIDE FOR APPLYING FOR SUPER VISA FOR PARENTS AND GRAND PARENTS

CANADA GUIDE FOR APPLYING FOR SUPER VISA FOR PARENTS AND GRAND PARENTS

Super Visa for parents and grandparents

The Super Visa Program allows parents and grandparents to come to Canada as long-term visitors. Parents and grandparents of permanent residents of Canada or Canadian citizens can apply for this visa meaning that parents and grandparents of visitors, workers and students are not eligible to apply it. Super visa is a multi-entry visa with an expiry period of up to 10 years & allows entry periods lasting up to 2 years on each entry into Canada, without the need to renew the status. You can apply either online or on paper to get a parent and grandparent super visa.

To be eligible for the Super Visa program, parents and grandparents must meet standard visitor visa requirements such as ties to home country, purpose of visit, their financial condition & in addition, their child or grandchild in Canada – must meet minimum income threshold; prove they have purchase health insurance for at least one year from a Canadian company; and parents and grandparents complete an immigration medical examination.

Your application must attach the following documents:

Proof of relationship with the person you want to visit in Canada- it may include birth certificate or some other official document.
Letter of invitation from your child or grandchild. It must include host child or host grandchild’s family composition as it will determine minimum income required by your host.
Proof that your child or grandchild have private medical insurance from a Canadian insurance company valid for at least one year and that it for minimum of $100,000 & valid for each entry.
Proof that you have undergone a medical examination.
Proof that your child or grandchild meet minimum income threshold. The document in support could be one of the following-

CRA Notice of Assessment, Most recent copy of the T4 or T1, Original letter from employer stating title, job description and salary, If self-employed, a letter from an accountant confirming annual income. The most recent copy of the notice of assessment can be viewed and printed by using the Canada Revenue Agency – My Account online service by visiting www.cra.gc.ca/myaccount

Minimum income threshold is determined as per host child or host grandchild’s family composition e.g.

Suppose your host child or host grandchild’s are husband and wife plus one dependent child and they are inviting their mother and father the number of persons for the purpose of LICO will be 5.

Income Table

Effective from January 1 to December 31, 2016.
Your child or grandchild may use the following income scale to assess their ability to meet the income requirements.

Low Income Cut-Off (LICO)
Size of Family Unit Minimum necessary income
1 person (your child or grandchild) $24,328
2 persons $30,286
3 persons $37,234
4 persons $45,206
5 persons $51,272
6 persons $57,826
7 persons $64,381
More than 7 persons, for each additional person, add $6,555

CANADA KEY REASON FOR LATE EXPRESS DRAW HELD ON 2ND AUGUST

CANADA KEY REASON FOR LATE EXPRESS DRAW HELD ON 2ND AUGUST AFTER LAST DRAW OF 12TH JULY BECAUSE IT HAS ANNUAL INTAKE OF 71,700 THIS YEAR OUT OF WHICH DRAWS APPROX 55000 ALREADY HELD UNTIL 12TH JULY 2017

Key Reasons for the Slowed Pace of Express Entry Draws

The last or draw of Federal Express Entry system launched on 12 July 2017 and since then it has been a long wait for the applicants. Usually, the Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) launch the express entry draws fortnightly (every 15 days) basis. However, for the last two draws, the trend has not been followed by IRCC and draws, in fact, were launched very late.

Earlier the EE draw trends used to break in terms of pre-launch of the draw, however, now it’s otherwise. It has been a matter of surprise for many applicants, especially after the incredible performance by Express Entry in the first half of the year.

There are multiple factors behind the slow pace of Express Entry draws.

Annual Immigration Target Factor

Firstly, Canada has an immigration target of 71,700 invitations for Skilled Workers as per their Annual immigration plan 2017. This number includes candidates to be invited from all the below three categories of Express Entry System, i.e.

Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSW)
Federal Skilled Trades Class (FST)
Canadian Experience Class (CEC)

However, until July 12, 2017, close to 55,000 candidates have already been invited for Canadian Permanent Residency (PR) by IRCC, courtesy massive draws of express entry this year. This year IRCC has followed a pattern of about 3,000 invitations per express entry draw.

Now, as per the express entry draw frequency (fortnightly draws), close to 11 EE draws are remaining this year. Hence, it is explicable as to why the pace or frequency of express entry draws has been slowed by the Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)- the federal immigration department of Canada.

Provincial Nominee Program Factor

Meanwhile, Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) are doing a good job in terms of inviting and selecting the fair amount of candidates for provincial nomination, so that they can subsequently get the PR in Canada. So, when the express entry draws go slow, PNPs of Canada took the charge and issue invitations to the significant number of candidates.

What Canada immigration applicants need to do this juncture?

Well, apart from playing a waiting game, you can do some futuristic things. First of all, if you are not receiving invitation due to low CRS score, you can take steps to improve your points to be in a better position to get ITA (Invitation to apply) for Canadian PR from IRCC.

AUSTRALIA 56 IMPORTANT STUDENT VISA INTERVIEW QUESTIONS WHICH STUDENT NEED TO READY TO ANSWER BUT REMEMBER INTERVIEW IS NOT MANDATORY

AUSTRALIA 56 IMPORTANT STUDENT VISA INTERVIEW QUESTIONS WHICH STUDENT NEED TO READY TO ANSWER BUT REMEMBER INTERVIEW IS NOT MANDATORY

IMPORTANT AUSTRALIAN STUDENT VISA INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

WHY Australia?
Q: Why do you wish to study in the Australia?
Q: What if you get an Australia degree here, would you like to go to Australia again for higher Studies?
Q: Why did you select Australia for higher studies? Isn’t this course offered by any university or college in India?
Q: What is the purpose of your trip?
Q: Have you ever been to Australia?

ABOUT COURSE
Q: What course are you going for?
Q: Why did you select this course? Is it relevant to your previous studies?
Q: Why are you taking this course?
Q: What is the course structure & contents?
Q: Why don’t you do this course in your home country?
Q: How long will your studies last?
Q: What is the scope of your course?
Q: What benefit will bring this course to you?
Q: What is the course commencement date?
Q: What will be the total cost of per year?
Q: Where will you stay in Australia?

ABOUT YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND
Q: Where did you do your last course of study?
Q: What is your High School, Degree or Master’s percentage or grade?
Q: What are your subjects in last course of study (High School, Degree or Master’s)?

ABOUT YOUR INSTITUTE
Q: In which university you are going?
Q: Can you tell me some details about your university?
Q: Why have you chosen this specific university?
Q: Can you tell me the location of the university/college?
Q: Why did you choose this institute and how did you find about it?
Q: How many universities did you apply for? (Both admits and rejects)
Q: Did you receive any scholarships?

TEST PREPERTIONS
Q: Could you please show me your TOEFL/IELTS scorecard?
Q: What is your IELTS/ TOEFL score?
Q: Why are your TOEFL/IELTS score lows?

ABOUT YOUR FAMILY
Q: What does your father do?
Q: How many brothers and sisters do you have?
Q: What is your father’s annual income?
Q: Where your brother/parents did completed their studies.
Q: Do you have a brother / sister, or any other relative already at this university?

SPONSOR AND FINANCIAL DETAILS
Q: Have you got any Loans?
Q: What are the sources of income of your sponsor?
Q: What proof do you have that your sponsor can support your studies?
Q: Who is paying for your education and what is his/her income?
Q: Who is sponsoring you?
Q: How many people are dependents of your sponsor?
Q: Why is he sponsoring you? (If not father)
Q: How much money is available for your stay i
Q: How are you related to your sponsor?
Q: How will you finance your education funds?

FUTURE PLANS (CAREER PROSPECTS)
Q: What are you plans after completing your studies?
Q: What will you do after completing BA BSC MA MBA
Q: What will you do after coming back to Home?
Q: How much money can you earn after your completion of studies?
Q: What are your future plans after completion of your studies?
Q: Do you intend to work in Australia during or after completion of your studies?
Q: How can you prove that you will come back after finishing your studies?

VISA OR REFUSAL
Q: If the VISA officer asks why should I grant you VISA what should your answer?
Q: What will you do if your Visa is rejected?

MISCELLANEOUS
Q: Have you ever visited any other country?
Q: Will you come back to home during summers?
Q: What will you do during the off period/semester?

CANADA TEN TOP REASONS WHY THIS COUNTRY IS BEST IN THE WORLD FOR WORTH LIVING AND MOVING BY IMMIGRANTS

CANADA TEN TOP REASONS WHY THIS COUNTRY IS BEST IN THE WORLD FOR WORTH LIVING AND MOVING BY IMMIGRANTS

10 Reasons Why Canada is Best

1. Water for Life – Our Tap Water Rocks

Canada’s tap water is the best. Studies have shown that no North American bottled water is safer or better for your health than what comes from our taps. So drink up and enjoy. When organizations like Humanity First provide assistance in third world, their standards are based on quality of water available in their homeland Canada.

2. Knowledge for Life – We’re Educated!

According to a Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) report on global education, Canada has the highest proportion of college grads (or those with tertiary education) – 51 per cent. That makes us the most educated country in the world (or at least amongst those in the study). Gold star!

3. Learn a Skill – We are Skilled!

Economy remains strong and jobs are abundant in most parts of Canada. Whether you are professional, a college grad, a skilled labour or just high school dropout, Canada has a job available for you.

4. Global Health

Health care is a pretty awesome thing. We worry about our health and not hospital bills. We are very lucky that we live in Canada and take health care for granted. Our robust healthcare systems even covers us internationally if there is a medical emergency.

Our health care system is very advanced and our skilled doctors and other medical professionals regularly volunteer with organizations like Humanity First to help people in third world countries with no or basic health care system.

5. Refugee Resettlement

Canada has open heart and our immigration is still open and welcoming to people from other nations. Any Canadian can sponsor a refugee and assist in resettlement in Canada. Last year many Canadians worked with refugee sponsorship organizations like Humanity First to resettle thousands of Syrain refugees in Canada.

6. Community Care

Interfaith, Multifaith, Multi-Culturism or Mosaic, use any word – It will simply mean Canada! The most diverse country where multicultural communities live in peace and harmony and care for each other. A country that takes cares of its seniors as well as its children.

Canadian humanitarian organizations like Humanity First offers programs for seniors, women and new immigrants to keep them engaged and integrated in the society.

7. Orphan Care

Approximately 1 in 5 Canadians are touched by adoption. They are either adopted themselves, have an adopted sibling or family member, are adoptive parents, birthparents, or birth relatives. Today, that means almost 7 million Canadians are affected by adoption.

There are thousands of children available for adoption in Canada through the public child welfare system, including babies. However, the majority of children waiting for adoptive families are age 6 and older. These children need permanent homes and are rewarding additions to the families who adopt them.

8. Food Security

The social system is there to take care of those who are unable to take care of themselves. In addition to that, there are many food banks like Humanity First Feed a Family program across Canada, that puts food on the table of many needy families.

9. Disaster Relief and Emergency Preparedness.

In Canada, emergency management adopts an all-hazards approach to address both natural and human-induced hazards and disasters. These are increasing in both number and frequency across the world, resulting in ever growing human suffering and economic cost. Canada is not immune to these events.

Government has a responsibility for emergency management and public safety in Canada. Governments, Indigenous peoples, municipalities/communities, academia, volunteer and non-governmental organizations like Humanity First strengthen our collective ability to better prevent/mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from emergencies.

Canadian safety programs, activities and standards enable and inspire all emergency management partners and the whole-of-society in Canada to work in better collaboration to keep Canadians safe.

10. Canadians put “Humanity” First

Canadians are very generous and are ever ready to assist people in need. The Canadian Government offers Humanitarian Asisstance and Development funds to counties affected by disasters or poverty. Canadian NGOs like Humanity First are in the fore front representing Canada and assisting people in need.

Most importantly this is all possible due to generosity of Canadians and their love for humanity.

CANADA ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SPOUSE WORK PERMIT

CANADA ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SPOUSE WORK PERMIT

The eligibility criteria for spouse’s work permit in Canada

Working is essential in today’s time. The economic constraints make it a necessity for you to work. When you are staying in a foreign land, money doesn’t come cheap, so to make your ends meet, you and your spouse have to work or if you are a student and have no time to work then it falls on your spouse’s or common-law partner’s shoulder to earn the expenses. Canada allows spouse of an immigrant on temporary work visa or on student visa to work in Canada. So, what are the rules and regulations regarding work permit for spouse in Canada?

Immigrating to Canada on Work Visa- Explore getting Work Permit for Spouse in Canada !

Your spouse can get a work permit in Canada, but he/she will have to fulfill the eligibility criteria. These criteria are important as they are issued by the federal government of Canada.

The eligibility criteria for the work permit of your spouse vary, depending on your occupation. If you are a student then your spouse or common-law partner will have to suffice different eligibility criteria, but if you are going to Canada as a worker, then your spouse will need to satisfy different criteria.
Eligibility criteria for your spouse’s work permit when you are a student

If you are going to study in Canada and you need your spouse or common-law partner to get a job there, then he/she will have to acquire a work permit. To get his/her work permit, you must fall under any of these criteria:

You will need to hold a valid student permit
You should be a registered full-time student at a public post-secondary institution, such as a college or a university or collège d’enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP) in Quebec.
You should be a registered full-time student at a private post-secondary institution that operates under the same rules and regulation as a public institution and which receives a minimum of 50% of its financing from government grants. Presently, only private college-level educational institutions qualify for this.
You should be a registered student of a Canadian private institution which is authorized by provincial statute to confer degrees.

Under this, your spouse’s work permit is valid as long as your student permit is valid. The spouses or common-law partner’s who are accompanying a foreign student can also apply for an open work permit, which allows your spouse or common-law partner to get a work permit even before he/she has a job offer.
Eligibility criteria for your spouse’s work permit when you are a worker on Temporary Work Visa

Your spouse or common-law partner who is accompanying you when you are going to Canada as a worker can also get their work permit. Here the process of getting a work permit for your spouse is similar to the one you have followed to get your work permit. You spouse has to find out whether he/she will need a work permit or not for the job they are going to apply. You can find more about this at the Canadian government’s official site.

Moreover, if your spouse has already got a job offer before leaving for Canada, then your spouse’s employer will have to get a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA).

AUSTRALIA CALCULATE POINTS YOURSELF FOR APPLYING SKILLED INDEPENDENT SUBCLASS 189 VISA

AUSTRALIA CALCULATE POINTS YOURSELF FOR APPLYING SKILLED INDEPENDENT SUBCLASS 189 VISA

Factors of Points Assessment Grid:-

Age- Maximum 30 Points
English Language Proficiency- Maximum 20 Points
Educational Qualification- Maximum 20 Points
Work Experience- Maximum 20 Points
Australian Study (if any) – 5 points
Other factors

Note: Minimum points required to be eligible for Australia Skilled Independent Visa subclass 189 is 60.
Age

Age Points
18 to 24 25 Points
25 t0 32 30 Points
33 t0 39 25 Points
40 to 44 15 Points
45 to 49 0 Points
English (IELTS /OET)

Language Points Awarded
Competent English IELTS 6 / OET C 0 points
Proficient English IELTS 7 / OET B 10 point
Superior English IELTS 8 / OET A 20 points
Work Experience (Overseas)

Work Experience Points
At least three but less than five years (of past 10 years) 5 points
At least five but less than eight years (of past 10 years) 10 points
At least eight and up to 10 years (of past 10 years) 15 points
Work Experience (Australian)

Work Experience Points Awarded
At least one but less than three years (of past 10 years) 5 points
At least three but less than five years (of past 10 years) 10 points
At least five but less than eight years (of past 10 years) 15 points
At least eight and up to 10 years (of past 10 years) 20 Points
Educational Qualification

Educational Qualification Points
Doctorate from an Australian educational institution or other recognised standard 20 points
At least a Bachelor degree, including a Bachelor degree with Honours or Masters, from an Australian recognised Standards 15 points
Diploma completed in Australia, trade qualification completed in
Australia, or qualification or award of recognised standard 10 points
Australian study qualifications

Study Qualification Points
Diplomas or trade qualifications awarded by an Australian educational
institution and meet Australian Study Requirement 5 points
Other Factor

Other Factor Points
Credentialed community language qualifications 5 points
Study in regional Australia or metropolitan area (excluding distance education) 5 points
Partner skill qualifications 5 points
Professional Year completion, for a period of at least 12 months
in the four year 5 points

CANADA FIND INFORMATION ABOUT PROVINCIAL NOMINEE PROGRAM OF TEN PROVINCES

CANADA FIND INFORMATION ABOUT PROVINCIAL NOMINEE PROGRAM OF TEN PROVINCES

Nova Scotia Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through the Provincial Nominee Program involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with Provincial nominees programs.
You are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel).
The Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP) offers a quicker entry into Canada for qualified workers and experienced entrepreneurs who wish to settle in Nova Scotia and become permanent residents of Canada.

It allows Nova Scotia to recruit and select immigrants who can contribute to meeting the labour market and economic needs of the province.
NSNP Program Streams:-

Skilled Worker Stream – there are specific sectors in Nova Scotia that have many opportunities for skilled immigrants. This stream fast-tracks applicants who have the needed skills and permanent full-time job offers.

Family Business Worker Stream – this helps family-owned businesses to hire close relatives who have skills that couldn’t be found in Canadian citizens or permanent residents.This stream is employer-driven. The worker must have a guaranteed, permanent job offer in Nova Scotia from an employer who is a close relative and who owns an established business in Nova Scotia.

Non-Dependent Child of Nova Scotia Nominees Stream – The NSNP Non-Dependent Child of Nova Scotia Nominees stream is aimed at selecting individuals who are the non-dependent children of immigrants who were nominated under the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP). The Principal Applicant must plan to live in Nova Scotia permanently, be employable and be able to contribute to the labour market and economy of Nova Scotia.

International Graduate Stream – helps employers hire and retain recent international graduates whose skills may be in limited supply in the province. This stream targets international graduates who have established strong ties to Nova Scotia and intend to live, work, and establish their careers in this province.

Community Identified Stream – aimed at individuals who are employable, have strong established connections to a Nova Scotia community, and can contribute to the labour market and economy of that specific community.
Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP)

Processing your resident visa through the Alberta Provincial Nominee Program (AINP) involves two different processes: one with the provincial government and another with the federal government. Once you are nominated by Alberta, you may be eligible to get a Bridging Work Permit while the residence application is finalized. We have a wealth of experience dealing with the different streams of Alberta’s provincial nominee program.

One of our Certified Canadian Immigration Consultant members of ICCRC will represent you before the Government of Alberta and Citizenship and Immigration Canada in order to obtain your permanent resident visa.

The AINP is an immigration program operated on behalf of the Government of Alberta by the Ministry of Employment and Immigration in conjunction with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to expedite the processing of applying for permanent residence.
Who can apply?

Categories where No job offer is needed:

Trade certificate holders
Engineers with Alberta work experience
Alberta’s post-graduation work permit holders
Farm Managers willing to purchase a farm in Alberta

Categories where a job offer is needed

Skilled Workers(NOC 0,A,B)
Canada’s post-graduation work permit holders (NOC 0,A,B,C)
Semi-skilled workers: certain positions in the following industries: Food Service, Hotel and Lodging, Trucking, Manufacturing, and Food and Beverage Processing.

BC Provincial Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with the provincial nominee program. You are protected; we are Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel). We can represent you before Citizenship and Immigration Canada in order to obtain your permanent resident visa.

The British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP) accelerates the Permanent Resident application process for skilled and/or experienced workers, experienced business persons and their family members who want to settle in BC permanently.
Who can apply?

This pilot project applies to qualifying foreign workers in select occupations and eligible employers in the tourism/hospitality, food processing and long-haul trucking industries. Prior to applying under this category nominee applicants must have worked full-time for their employer in BC for a period of nine consecutive months and have continuing full-time employment with that same employer at the time of application to the BC PNP.
Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through the Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with provincial nominee programs.
You are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel)
Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP)

The Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) can provide an alternate and quicker means of entry into Canada. It allows Saskatchewan to nominate applicants, who qualify under criteria established by the province, to the federal government for landed immigrant status.
Skilled Workers

This category is for skilled workers, professionals or managers who have a full-time, permanent job offer from a Saskatchewan employer. It is divided into three sub-categories: Skilled Workers/Professionals, Critical Occupations and Existing Work Permit.
Entrepreneurs

The Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) has launched a new process for the Entrepreneur Category that will improve processing times for applicants who wish to invest their management talent and capital in a Saskatchewan business. This category attracts investment and fosters the creation of more jobs in Saskatchewan.
Family Members

This category is for immigrant families living in Saskatchewan who want to help their skilled and educated family members come to work and live in the province. Supporting family members must provide support to applicants and their dependents to help them establish and settle in Saskatchewan.
Farm Owners / Operators

This category is for individuals with proven experience in farming, substantial capital available to invest in a farming operation, and who intend to purchase and operate a farming operation in Saskatchewan.
Health Professions

This category allows internationally-trained health professionals, who have been working in Saskatchewan for at least six months under a temporary work permit, to apply for permanent residency status under the SINP. It is divided into three sub-categories: Physicians, Nurses and Other Health Professions.
Hospitality Sector Pilot Project

Under the Hospitality Sector Pilot Project, the SINP can nominate foreign workers that are currently working in Saskatchewan in one of the following categories: Food/Beverage Server; Food Counter Attendant/Kitchen Helper; or Housekeeping/Cleaning Staff.
Long Haul Truck Drivers

This category allows Saskatchewan trucking firms to bring workers to the province for occupations requiring a high school diploma or on-the-job training under Service Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker policy.
Students

This category allows students who have graduated from a recognized, post-secondary educational institution in Canada and worked for at least six months for a Saskatchewan employer under a CIC post-graduation work permit in any field to apply for landed immigrant status under the SINP.
Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP) involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with provincial nominee programs. you are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel). We can represent you before Citizenship and Immigration Canada in order to obtain your permanent resident visa through the Manitoba PNP program.

The Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP) is a government immigration program that selects skilled workers who demonstrate they have the potential and the desire to immigrate and settle themselves and their families in the Canadian province of Manitoba.
Who can apply?
You must comply with one of the following streams:
Employer Direct

have an offer of a long-term, full-time job in Manitoba
have a work permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada
be currently working for the Manitoba employer that has offered you the job and been working there for at least six months

International Student

an offer of a long-term, full-time job in Manitoba
a post-graduate open work permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada after you completed a post-secondary educational program of at least eight months in Manitoba
currently working for the Manitoba employer that offered you the job and been working there for at least six months

Family Support

a close relative in Manitoba who has signed a Manitoba Affidavit of Support (MAS)

Strategic Initiatives

Strategic Initiatives are undertaken at the discretion of the MPNP in accordance with program needs and available resources. You are eligible to apply if you:

participated in an exploratory visit to Manitoba, confirmed by the MPNP, and had an interview with aMPNP officer, or
were interviewed by a MPNP officer and received a letter of invitation to apply as part of a MPNP targeted overseas promotional initiative, or
have the support of an ethnocultural community organization in Manitoba that will help you arrange an exploratory visit that has been pre-approved by the MPNP

General stream

You must have at least one of the following:

a close relative in Manitoba who has signed an Affidavit of Support (MAS)
two friends or distant relatives in Manitoba who have each signed an affidavit of support
completed education in Manitoba
previous work experience in Manitoba (six months minimum)

To apply in any of the streams you must provide evidence that you have financial resources in your own name demonstrating that you are able to:

pay your Government of Canada immigration fees and travel expenses to Manitoba
support yourself while you are looking for employment
ensure your successful settlement in Manitoba

As a general rule, applicants should have at least C$10,000 plus C$2,000 for each accompanying dependant.
Ontario Provincial Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through the Provincial Nominee Program involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with the provincial nominees program.

You are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel)

The Ontario Provincial Nominee program may be a pathway to permanent resident status for foreign workers and international students. However, it is important to understand that in most instances this program is employer-driven. That means you can only apply if you have a permanent full-time job offer, your employer is pre-screened and the position is approved by Opportunities Ontario.
Who can apply?

a) You have a permanent, full-time job offer from an Ontario employer in a skilled occupation (NOC 0, A, B)
b) The only exception to the requirement of having a permanent full-time job offer are international students who are graduates of a PhD or Masters program from one of Ontario’s publicly funded universities.

Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through the PNP involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with Provincial nominees programs.

You are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel).

The Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program seeks to recruit immigrants who have specialized occupational or entrepreneurial skills. Through an agreement with the Government of Canada, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador may nominate immigrants, who can contribute to the economic and social goals of the province, for permanent resident status.
Occupational/Skilled Worker

An applicant with specialized skills and experience which may fill a shortage or specialized need in the existing provincial labour market. Applicants much have either a guaranteed job offer from a local employer or be currently employed within the province on a valid work permit. Click here for more details.
Immigrant Entrepreneur

This program is currently under revision.
Family Connection

This category is for immigrant families living in Newfoundland and Labrador who want to help their overseas family members relocate and work in the province. Click here for more details.
International Graduate

This category allows international students, who have graduated from a recognized Newfoundland and Labrador post-secondary educational institution, to be considered for nomination for permanent residence in Canada.
New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with Provincial nominees programs.
You are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel)
The New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program welcomes applicants in two categories: skilled worker applicants and business applicants.
Skilled workers are considered under two streams:

Employer stream: A guaranteed offer of permanent employment from a New Brunswick employer, or,
Family stream: A family supporter who is a citizen or permanent resident of New Brunswick, who has been living and working in the province for a minimum of one year, and who has made a commitment to assist your settlement in New Brunswick.

Successful Business applicants must:

Meet eligibility criteria.
Complete an exploratory visit to New Brunswick.
Have an approved business plan or business proposal.
Obtain a minimum score of 50 points.
Make a CDN $75,000.00 conditionally refundable deposit.

All applicants must make a commitment to reside in New Brunswick, with their dependents and are required to sign a declaration confirming their intention to live and work in this Province.
Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program

Processing your resident visa through the Provincial Nominee Program involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with Provincial nominees programs.
You are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel).

The Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program expedites immigration to Canada for individuals and their families who meet provincial criteria. The four categories under the Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program are as follows:

Immigrant Partner Category – A principal applicant who proposes to make an investment in an existing Prince Edward Island company and to take an active role in that company as a director or senior manager.

Immigrant Entrepreneur Category – A principal applicant who proposes to establish a viable, new business in Prince Edward Island.

Immigrant Connections Category – A principal applicant suggested by a Prince Edward Island based “champion” who meets settlement and employability criteria.

Skilled Worker Category – A principal applicant with specialized skills and experience who fills a labour market need in Prince Edward Island (A job offer is needed).
Yukon Nominee Program (YNP)

Processing your resident visa through the Provincial Nominee Program involves two different processes: One with the provincial government, and another with the federal government. We have a wealth of experience dealing with Provincial nominees programs.

You are protected; we are Canadian Lawyer and Regulated Consultant Immigration Canada, members of ICCRC (Immigration Consultant Of Canada Regulatory Counsel).

There are three programs the Yukon Nominee Program offers: the Skilled Worker Program, the Critical Impact Worker Program and the Business Program

Business Nominee Program: It is designed to attract business expertise and investment capital to the territory. The Business Program has two components: an Entrepreneur category and a Self Employed category.

Skilled Worker Program: It is designed to attract qualified individuals who can help alleviate the shortage of skilled workers in the Territory who cannot be found within the current territorial or national labour market.

Critical Impact Worker Program: It provides Yukon employers with the means to fill semi-skilled jobs in the levels of C and D.

AUSTRALIA AFTER ABOLITION OF 457 VISA

AUSTRALIA AFTER ABOLITION OF 457 VISA BUSINESSES FACING TROUBLE IN RECRUITING FOREIGN WORKERS AND NOW ADVISED TO USE SUBCLASS 124 VISA KNOWN AS DISTINGUISHED TALENT VISA BUT IT HAS ONLY 200 PLACES WHICH ALREADY GOT FILLED IN MAY 2017

Businesses facing obstacles recruiting workers following the 457 reforms are being advised to use the ‘distinguished talent’ visa, even though just 200 of these visas are granted each year.

Opportunities to recruit international leaders in sport, art or research may be lost by a predicted overloading of the distinguished talent visa program caused by the 457 reforms.

The government is maintaining its ceiling of 200 places for the distinguished talent visa (DTV) program for 2017-18, despite Department of Immigration Secretary Mike Pezzullo advising businesses and universities to use DTVs if they face obstacles in the new 457 program. A backlog of applications has already begun building in 2016-17.

Alex Kaufman, Migration Manager at employment advisory firm FCB, said there will be many people who – because of their age or occupation – no longer qualify for the general skilled migration program but may qualify for the distinguished talent visa.

“With such a small quota, a significant proportion of these DTV applications would need to be carried over and processed in the next program year, and on that basis, it is easy to see applications eventually being pipelined for multiple years,” he said.

A Department of Immigration spokesperson could not confirm when the 2017-18 ceiling is expected to be met. In the Senate Estimates hearing in May, an official from the Department confirmed they did not do modelling on how changes to the 457 visas might affect the DTV program.

The ceiling of 200 for 2016-17 had already been reached with more than a month still to go in the current financial year, and the 457 reforms were only announced in April.

The distinguished talent program awards permanent visas to applicants who demonstrate “an internationally recognised record of exceptional and outstanding achievement”.

French-born make-up artist Charlotte Ravet, who was awarded a distinguished talent visa two years ago based on her experience working in Europe for brands such as Yves Saint Laurent, Prada and MiuMiu, said if her application had taken more than six months, she may not have waited for the outcome.

“I had a strong network of clients in Paris and would probably have had to return to my life there,” she said.

“It is harder to obtain clients when you do not have permanent residency and I couldn’t wait for years as it could have slowed down my career.”

Mr Pezzullo sought to assure a Senate Estimates hearing in May that the immigration changes will not mean Australia loses out on top international academic talent, now limited by an age restriction of 45 years in some cases.

“We will always ensure that Australia gets the distinguished talent that it needs to do its national business,” he said.

AUSTRALIA ACT SKILLED MIGRATION

AUSTRALIA ACT SKILLED MIGRATION CLOSED UNTIL 30TH JUNE 2017 FOR OVERSEAS APPLICATIONS FROM IMMIGRANTS EXCEPT THOSE HOLDING PHD DEGREE AND THOSE ALREADY IN CANBERRA

ACT Skilled Migration Program closed to overseas applicants until July 2017
Canberra residents

This action does not affect Canberra based applicants. You are still able to apply for ACT nomination if you meet the nomination criteria.
Streamlined PhD nominations

This action does not affect ACT PhD alumni living overseas. You are still able to apply for steamlined nomination if you meet the nomination criteria. Email migrationservices@act.gov.au for advice on how to lodge the online application.
ACT Occupation List will be updated in July 2017

On 19/04/2017, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection removed 216 occupations from the eligible list of occupations; and replaced the Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List (CSOL) with the Combined Occupation List. A new ‘ACT Occupation List’, based on the Combined Occupation List, will be announced in July.

AUSTRALIA 457 VISA DOCUMENT CHECKLIST REQUIRED FROM SPONSORING EMPLOYER

AUSTRALIA 457 VISA DOCUMENT CHECKLIST REQUIRED FROM SPONSORING EMPLOYER

Temporary Work (Skilled) Visa (Subclass 457) Sponsor Document Checklist
Why attaching supporting documents is important

You must provide documents to prove the claims you make in your application to become a sponsor. Your application might be decided solely on the basis of the information you provide when you lodge the application. Failure to provide all necessary documentation or to answer all questions on the application form fully and accurately might result in your application being assessed without us asking you for any further documents.

To lodge a complete application you should attach scanned copies of any associated original documents through your ImmiAccount as part of the online application process. Documents not in English must be accompanied by accredited English translations.

Use this checklist to make sure your application is complete.
Forms

You must apply online by completing the eVisa application 1196Employer Sponsored Workers (e457)

General business registration documents

Australian Business Number (ABN) registration certificate (if you are an Australian-based employer).
Australian Registered Body Number (ARBN) registration certificate (if you are an overseas business registered to operate in Australia).
If you are an overseas business that is not already operating in Australia, you must provide evidence of registration in the country you operate in.
If your business has a registered business or trading name, a copy of the Business Names Details extract from Australian Securities and Investment Commission’s (ASIC) business name register.
If your business is a company, provide one of the following:
Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) company extract (listing registration details for the Australian Company Number)
Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) listing registration (if applicable).
If your business operates under a trust arrangement, provide relevant pages of the trust deed (pages listing parties to the trust and the signature page)
If you are a franchisee, provide the relevant pages of the franchise agreement (pages listing the parties to the agreement and the signature page).
If your business operates under a joint venture arrangement, provide relevant pages of the joint venture agreement (pages listing the parties to the joint venture and the signature page).

Documents to show you are lawfully operating a business

To show that your business is operating, you should provide the following documents, where relevant:
If you are a larger, established business which has been operating over a number of years: recent financial reports (profit and loss statements, annual report for the most recently concluded financial year).
If you are a recently established or small business: business tax returns for the most recently concluded financial year; recent business activity statements (BAS); recent bank statements.
New businesses can show they are operating by providing, at a minimum:
a detailed business plan with preferably:
contracts to provide services
business bank statements covering the period of operation
If any of these attachments are not provided, a statement should be included as to why they are not available.
Additional information that can be provided includes:
contract of sale relating to the purchase of the business, where settlement has occurred
lease agreement relating to business premises
evidence of employment of staff
business activity statements (BAS) for each complete quarter from commencement of operations to date of lodgement.

Documents to show your business meets training requirements

If you have traded in Australia for 12 months or more, provide documents to show that you meet one of the training benchmarks. Examples of documents include:
receipts for training expenditure for your employees who are Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents
payroll details (salary costs and numbers) for trainees and apprentices and evidence that a training contract exists
contracts with external training providers
receipts for contributions made to an Industry Training Fund (that is a statutory authority responsible for providing funding for training of workers in the same industry as the nominated occupation)
receipts for contributions made to a recognised scholarship fund operated by a university or TAFE college.

Important: The above documents must cover the same 12 month period (for example, payroll and expenditure periods must match). Under policy, this period should be the 12 month period prior to lodgement of your application. Where this is not possible, evidence from the most recent financial year (1 July – 30 June) can be provided. In this case, however, you should clearly identify the period you are using in your application and explain why.

If you have traded in Australia for less than 12 months, provide an auditable plan to show how you will meet one of the training benchmarks, including:
the forecast payroll for the next 12 months
the intended expenditure towards either training benchmark
how you will implement the plan.

Note: If you are planning on training your Australian citizen and permanent resident employees for training benchmark B, clearly articulate the type and duration of training, and the estimated cost of delivering the training.
Additional documents for overseas businesses not currently operating in Australia

Provide documents to show your intention to set up a business in Australia or that you have a contractual obligation in Australia:
a company or business expansion plan
an agreement to enter into a joint venture
a contract between you and a party in Australia.

Contact information

If the information associated with your application needs to be updated, please do so through your ImmiAccount. The processing centre responsible for processing your application can be contacted through 457@border.gov.au. If you email this address please read the auto response to be advised of response timeframes and instances where a reply might not be available.

AUSTRALIA WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO BECOME ACCREDITED SPONSOR FOR 457 VISA HOLDERS FOR FAST TRACKING VISA

AUSTRALIA WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO BECOME ACCREDITED SPONSOR FOR 457 VISA HOLDERS FOR FAST TRACKING VISA

Australian Government Department of Immigration and Border Protection Banner

Changes to accredited sponsorship
arrangements for 1 July 2016

What is changing?

As outlined below, the required characteristics that you need to meet to become an Accredited Sponsor are
changing on 1 July 2016. Additional benefits will also be associated with sponsorship accreditation.

What is an accredited sponsor?

457 sponsors who have a long history of good dealings with the Department of Immigration and Border
Protection (DIBP) are able to apply to become ‘Accredited Sponsors’ – with their sponsorship then valid for
six years, and visa and nomination applications receiving priority processing.

What characteristics do you need to meet to become an accredited sponsor?

In order to qualify for Accredited Status, a sponsor must meet all the requirements for standard business
sponsorship and have all of the following additional characteristics:

– be a government agency, a publicly-listed company or a private company with at least AUD four million
annual turnover for the last three years;
– have been an active 457 sponsor for at least three years (with no more than a six month break in the past
36 months), with no adverse information (based on monitoring, including formal warnings and sanctions);
– have sponsored at least ten primary 457 visa holders in the 24 months prior to the application for
accreditation;
– have lodged an agreed level of decision-ready applications over the previous two years;
– have a non-approval rate of less than 3% for the previous three years;
– have Australian workers comprising at least 75% of their workforce in Australia;
– engage all 457 holders as employees under a written contract of employment that includes at least the
minimum employment entitlements as required under the National Employment Standards (unless their
occupation is exempt from this requirement);
– a copy of a template contract used for this purpose must be attached to the application;

– have all Australian employees paid in accordance with an Enterprise Agreement or an internal salary
table that reflects the current market salary rates for all occupations in their business;
– a copy of the Enterprise Agreement or internal salary table must be attached to the application in
addition to evidence and a description of how the business used the evidence to determine that the
salary rates contained in the document reflect the current market salary rates for occupations in their
business (for example: Awards, remuneration surveys, job advertisements, the Australian
Government’s Job Outlook);

– have provided details of all business activities undertaken by their business to the department;
– evidence relating to the other business activities must be attached to the application (for example:
profit / loss statements, Business Activity Statements, annual reports); and

– have provided details of all Principals / Directors of their business to the department
– if the business is a company, a current / historical extract from the Australian Securities and
Investments Commission (ASIC) must be attached to the application.

Are there any additional benefits associated with sponsorship
accreditation?

In addition to priority processing of nomination and visa applications, sponsors approved with accredited
status after 1 July 2016 will also be eligible for streamlined processing of nominations where the nominated
base salary is equal to or greater than:

– the Fair Work High Income Threshold and the occupation is classified as skill level 1 or 2 in the ANZSCO
(Note: The current amount can be found on the Fair Work Ombudsman website:
https://www.fairwork.gov.au/awards-and-agreements/award-and-agreement-free-wages-and-conditions
under the heading ‘High income employees’).

or

– $75,000 and the occupation is classified as skill level 1 or 2 in the ANZSCO with the exception of the
following occupations:
– recruitment consultant
– sales representative (industrial products)
– customer service manager
– corporate general manager
– procurement manager
– quality assurance manager
– sales and marketing manager
– specialist manager NEC
– hotel/motel manager
– contract administrator
– information and organization professionals NEC

How do I get accreditation?

The Department will be writing to existing accredited sponsors and giving them an opportunity to upgrade
their accredited status in June 2016 to enable them to access the new streamlined nomination processing
arrangements. If they chose not to ‘upgrade’ or do not meet the new characteristics, they will continue to
receive priority processing as per current arrangements until the end of their current sponsorship agreement.

The Department will, however, be reviewing existing accredited sponsors to ensure that they do meet the
current criteria for accreditation, and may revoke accreditation where this is not the case.

If you are an existing sponsor who now meets the characteristics for accreditation, you can lodge a
sponsorship variation application post 1 July 2016 and ask to be considered for sponsorship accreditation.

Where can I get more information?

The Department’s website, as well as 457 sponsorship and nomination policy guidelines, are being updated
for 1 July 2016 with more information on these new arrangements.

 

Study in Northern Cyprus | European University of Lefke

Study in Northern Cyprus | European University of Lefke | Without IELTS | Scholarship Available | Turkey
 
 
“40% Scholarships to all International Students for all Bachelors
50% for all Master Degree Programs”
 
Why Study in Northern Cyprus?
• Internationally Recognized University
• Diverse & Strong Academic Programmes
• Large Number of Foreign Tutors
• Lowest Tuition Fees, Low Cost of Accommodation & Cost of Living
• Non-Profit Orientated, Student & Employee Friendly University
• Small Classes & Low Student-Academic Staff Ratio
• On / Off Campus Modern Dormitories
• Guidance, Orientation & Consultancy Services
• Scholarship & Assistantship Opportunities
• Safe & Secure Environment + Warm & Friendly Atmosphere
• Ideal Location & Excellent Climate
• Great Sports Facilities on Campus
Facts about European University of Lefke
• Government Establishment, Non-profit institution Founded in 1990
• International Student Population from 37 Different Countries
• 38 Undergraduate Degree Programmes
• 11 Postgraduate Degree Programs
• 6 Associate Degree Programs & 5 PhD Programmes
• English Preparatory School
• Agreements & Memorandums of Understanding “MOU” with British, American, European, Asian, and Turkish Universities
• Experienced International Academic Staff
• Medium of Instruction is English
 
Programs Available – 1 Year
Program Level Tuition Fees
1. English Foundation Foundation $3,800 USD
2. Construction Management MSc $4,640 USD
3. Business Administration MBA $4,640 USD
4. International Relations MA $4,640 USD
5. International Economics & Finance MA $4,640 USD
Visa Requirements
• Student Need to show 4.5 Lakh Rs in their personal bank account – One day old funds is accepted
• Bank statement + certificate is required
• Once a student receives his/her official Acceptance Letter, please ask them to start the visa procedure @ Turkish Embassy
Post Study Work Visa
• Student can use the last 6 months of their study (thesis period) as Job Search Visa
 
Call Varun @ +91 97815 53162 for more details
 
IndOz Overseas
#IndozOverseas
 

 AUSTRALIA WHO CAN APPLY FOR PARTNER VISA CHILDREN VISA AND PARENT VISA AND REQUIREMENTS

AUSTRALIA WHO CAN APPLY FOR PARTNER VISA CHILDREN VISA AND PARENT VISA AND REQUIREMENTS

The Australian government understands that people need to be close to their loved ones and that they are going to be healthier and happier if they have the support of their loved ones around them. It is because of these reasons that the family migration scheme allows those who are eligible to sponsor their family members too come and live with them in the country on either a temporary or permanent visa.

In order for this to be done, both the sponsor and the applicant need to fulfil the eligibility requirements which are different for each separate category in the family migration scheme. The sponsor has to support their relatives who come to the country till a period of two years from their arrival is and the applicant needs to fulfil all the eligibility requirements for the visa category they are applying for including the requirements of character and health.

The following are allowed to get family visas according to Australia’s immigration policy:

Partners – Spouses, fiancés or same sex partners
Children
Parents
Any other relative

Partner Visas

Visas for partners are available for Australian citizens, permanent Australian residents and eligible New Zealand citizens.

In order to obtain a partner visa, it is required that you show evidence that your relationship is stable, and that you have genuine feelings for each other and intend to live together. For a partner visa, either of the partners can apply for it. The partner may then be eligible to come to Australia from their home country and then get their visa status changed to permanent.

Children Visas

It is necessary that dependent children live with their parents. While it is an option for the children to migrate to Australia when their parents are migrating, they also have the option to migrate separately. The migration department in Australia has visas for biological children, adopted children and orphan relatives of Australian citizens, permanent Australian residents or New Zealand citizens who are eligible to apply for the visa.

The children who immigrate to their parents can be given permanent resident visas, which means they can work in Australia and even apply for citizenship (once they are eligible). There are also visas available for children under 18 of people who are on temporary business, worker or student visas.

Parent Visas

The parents of eligible New Zealand citizens, Australian permanent residents, or Australian citizens can apply for visa under two categories:

Parent Migrant visa – subclass 103
Aged Parent Residence visa – subclass 804

In order to be eligible for an aged parent visa, a person needs to be sponsored by their child or stepchild, who is eligible to sponsor their parents for a residence visa. The applicant also needs to meet the following requirements:

More children living in Australia as eligible New Zealand citizens, Australian permanent residents, or Australian citizens than in any other country.
Most of your children must be eligible New Zealand citizens, Australian citizens, or Australian permanent residents who mostly live in Australia.

Both the sponsor and the applicant need to meet the above requirements to be eligible for the Parent visa.

Year 12 qualifications from Punjab no longer recognised by DIBP

Year 12 qualifications from Punjab no longer recognised by DIBP

In what some agents say is something completely new, the department of immigration has apparently started refusing student visa applications of Indian students who have completed Class XII from schools affiliated to the Punjab School Education Board.

According to a report in the Times of India, in a rejection letter sent to an Indian student who had applied for a “vocational education and training sector (subclass 572) visa”, the department’s refusal letter stated that “education and examinations conducted through the PSEB are not listed as equivalent to an Australian Grade 12 qualification under the Australian Education International – National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition Guidelines (AEI-NOOSR)”.

Speaking to the newspaper, an education agent said that “Citing this reason is completely new…There have been several rejections on this ground in the last couple of days.”

According to the report Punjab education minister Daljit Singh Cheema is investigating the matter. Mr Cheema told the newspaper that, “PSEB is one of the best boards in the country. Till date, thousands of students who have passed from PSEB are studying in different parts of the world and excelling in their respective fields. The board is strictly following the National Curriculum Framework – 2005 and is a member of the Council of Board of Secondary Education (COBSE).”

The PSEB is a statutory authority that governs  almost every aspect and stage of school education in Punjab.

Mr Cheema said that any student facing difficulties in obtaining recognition of their PSEB studies when applying for an overseas visa should notify the PSEB so that the matter “could be further raised to the highest level at the earliest.”

USA Student Visa Interview Sample

USA STUDENT VISA INTERVIEW OF ONE INDIAN STUDENT AT HYDERABAD CONSULATE IN INDIA AND READ QUESTIONS ASKED BY VISA OFFICER AND THEIR REPLIES AND FINALLY F-1 VISA GRANTED

Place: Hyderabad
Consulate Time: 9 AM
University: University of Illinois at Springfield
Counter: 9
Status: Approved!
It’s my time to share my VISA exp.

After completing my security formalities I have been proceeded to waiting line for the interview.
VO was a Young lady of 23-25 years age.
Before me a Visiting Visa was rejected. (I was tensed like even the visiting was rejected in front of me what about my F1 visa)

VO signaled me to come forward.
VO: Good morning!
Me: Good morning Mam! How are you?
VO: I’m fine! What about you?
Me: I’m fine Thanks for your concern!
VO: Please pass me your passport and I20.
Me: Sure. (She checked my I20 for about 20 seconds)
VO: So what is your Specialization?
Me: Data Base Management Systems (I got confused she asked me specialization not my favorite subject, Somehow I managed)
VO: What is Database?
Me: A collective of data is called as a Database in which it has a vast data.(I don’t know this is correct or not)
VO: What is Data?
Me: told
VO: How you store data and where?
Me: told
VO: How did you get to know about this University?
Me: One of my ug professors recommended me and some of my relatives and friends also. (I was well prepared for this.)
VO: What does your father do?
Me: told.
VO: What is your father’s income?
Me: told.
VO: Do you have any bank savings?
Me: told.
VO was typing for some time about 10-20 seconds
VO: Your VISA is Approved. Have a safe stay in US.
Me: Thank Q mam, Advance Happy Christmas!
VO: Hehe Thanks man!
All over the conversations I just maintaining my eye contact and my hand movement she was watching that. She dint even ask me 1 document.
So, guys be confident and be spontaneous! Maintain eye to eye contact, feel like casual talking to your relatives, do not listen to the others words, eye to eye contact, smile on your lips visa is yours!

Canada Spouse Visa Highlights

CANADA SIX THINGS TO CONSIDER WHILE APPLYING SPOUSE VISA FROM INSIDE CANADA OR OUTSIDE CANADA

6 things to consider when choosing between in-Canada and out-of-Canada spousal sponsorship

Couples wishing to apply for spousal (or common law) sponsorship are often faced with a dilemma. Should they use the in-Canada method or the out-of-Canada method? Answering this question is not always easy, as a number of factors must be considered. [Please note that, for ease of exposition, most references to ‘spouses’ in this article may be understood as meaning both spouses and common law partners.]

1. Can the foreign spouse or partner enter Canada?

This is the first thing to consider. Are the spouses currently in Canada? If the answer is no, then ask, Is the foreign spouse legally allowed to enter Canada? If the answer to that question is no, then an out-of-Canada application is the only way to go. To submit an in-Canada sponsorship application, both spouses must be currently residing in Canada. If one spouse is unable to enter Canada, then sponsorship Canada can be ruled out.

However, it should be noted that in-Canada sponsorship is not automatically ruled out when the foreign spouse is staying illegally in Canada with the Canadian spouse. Even if the foreign spouse has no status in Canada, an in-Canada sponsorship application may still be possible as long as both spouses are currently residing in Canada.

It should also be noted that even if both spouses reside in Canada, an out-of-Canada application is still possible, as a couple living in Canada can elect to have the application processed overseas.

2. Will one or both spouses be spending a significant period of time outside of Canada while the sponsorship Canada application is being processed?

If the answer is yes, then an in-Canada application may prove difficult. An in-Canada sponsorship application can be submitted if both spouses are currently residing in Canada. However, if the sponsoring spouse is spending most of his or her time living outside of Canada, say for work, then Citizenship and Immigration Canada may take the position that the couple is not actually residing in Canada. Also, if the sponsor is not regularly living with the sponsored person, and the sponsored person is living in Canada, there is a risk that CIC may take the view that the couple is not actually in a genuine relationship.

A couple should also consider whether the spouse being sponsored will have to travel overseas during the period when the sponsorship application is being processed. If that is likely, then an overseas application may be a better choice. While an out-of-Canada application can continue to be processed even if the sponsored spouse is residing overseas, an in-Canada application cannot be processed to completion if the sponsored spouse has left Canada. A short trip outside of Canada may be possible, but there is always the risk that the sponsored spouse may not be let back into Canada.

Many people mistakenly believe that the act of submitting the sponsorship application confers a special status on the sponsored spouse. This is not the case. The sponsored spouse has no special status in Canada simply from being sponsored, and only acquires permanent resident status when the sponsorship application is completed and the foreign spouse is approved for permanent residence. For this reason, a trip outside Canada during the processing of an in-Canada application is particularly risky for a foreign spouse who would otherwise require a visa to enter Canada.

However, even for a foreign spouse who would typically not require a visa to enter Canada, for example, an American spouse, there is always the risk that Canada Border Services Agency officers will refuse to allow re-entry. The fact that visas may not typically be required for citizens of a particular country to enter Canada does not guaranty that CBSA officers will permit entry to Canada for all citizens of that country.

3. What are the different processing times for in-Canada vs. out-of-Canada sponsorship applications?

In some cases overseas sponsorship applications will be much quicker than in-Canada applications. In other cases, the processing times will be about the same or even quicker for in-Canada applications. It is a good idea to check the processing times listed on the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website before choosing between the in-Canada and out-of-Canada options.

When considering processing times, you must consider processing times for both first stage and second stage approvals. For the first stage, CIC is considering the application of the sponsor. When the sponsor is approved in principle, then CIC considers the application of the person being sponsored (the foreign spouse) in the second stage. While first stage processing for out-of-Canada applications is usually fairly short, second stage applications processed through certain overseas visa offices may end up languishing for months or even years.

4. Does the foreign spouse need to be able to work (in Canada) within a short period of time?

If the foreign spouse needs to be able to work within Canada in a relatively short period of time, then an in-Canada application may be the way to go. Currently, CIC has a pilot program that enables many in-Canada sponsored spouses to apply for an open work permit, and to receive that open work permit in as little as 4 months.

While this pilot program is not available to those who apply outside of Canada, it should be noted that the out-of-Canada processing time for a given country may still be relatively short. So even if the spouse wants to begin work in Canada as soon as possible, an in-Canada application is not always the best way to go.

5. Does the couple want the right to appeal? Does the couple want to avoid a “problem” visa office?

With an overseas sponsorship application, the couple maintains the right to appeal a negative decision. This right does not exist in the case of in-Canada applications. However, the spouse may still have the ability to judicially review a negative in-Canada decision.

The right to an appeal process isn’t necessarily beneficial in all circumstances, however. If an application is much more likely to be rejected if processed at a particular visa office, for example, then a couple may wish to use the in-Canada procedure. I’m not sure if there is any publicly available data on this subject, but anecdotally it appears that certain visa offices are more inclined to determine that the relationships being considered are not genuine. I suspect that the in-Canada procedure is much more accepting of relationships than is the overseas procedure when those applications are being processed through, say, the Manila or Hong Kong visa offices.

6. Is either sponsorship process even possible?

For a couple currently living overseas, the only possible application is an out-of-Canada sponsorship. However, for many couples, even an out-of-Canada sponsorship will be possible. If a sponsor cannot demonstrate an intention to reside in Canada, then that person cannot sponsor a spouse for permanent residence.

For example, consider a Canadian citizen spouse who has lived overseas for 20 years. He or she has worked and lived outside of Canada for decades and does not currently own any property in Canada. For such a Canadian citizen spouse who has been long absent from Canada, Citizenship and Immigration Canada would likely be concerned that there would not in fact be a real intention to reside in Canada. The purpose of sponsoring someone for permanent residence is to allow that person to live with you in Canada. If you cannot demonstrate that you intend to live in Canada, CIC will not want to grant your spouse permanent residence, as this will give your spouse access to Canadian social benefits without this person ever contributing to Canadian society or paying Canadian taxes.

If you are living overseas and considering sponsorship, you should consider re-establishing ties to Canada. Some ways to help do this are through seeking employment in Canada, purchasing a home in Canada, or visiting Canada. In you can convince CIC that you have an actual intention to reside in Canada after the sponsorship application is approved, then you stand a much greater chance of having the application approved.

CANADA GUIDE FOR APPEALING VISA REJECTIONS AND REMOVALS

CANADA GUIDE FOR APPEALING AGAINST (1)SPOUSE SPONSORSHIP OR FAMILY MEMBERS(2)FAILING TO KEEP RESIDENCY OBLIGATIONS(3)AGAINST REMOVAL ORDER(4)LOSS OF PERMANENT STATUS RESIDENCY(5)RETURNING TO CANADA FOR FILING APPEAL

Appeal for refused cases of spousal sponsorship or other family members

If you are a permanent resident of Canada or a Canadian citizen, and your application to sponsor the immigration of a close family member to Canada has been rejected by CIC, then you may appeal (within 30 days after the refusal) to the Immigration Appeal Division (IAD) of the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB).

The Process

The appeal may go through an informal alternative dispute resolution (ADR) process.
In most cases, a member will be holding a hearing of the appeal as per the IRB tribunal process.
The appeal process includes the involvement of two parties: the appellant and the Minister’s counsel representing the CIC.
The process is often public in order for the media to attend or report its on-goings.
If it is concluded at the end of the hearing that the appeal be allowed, then the CIC will resume processing the sponsorship application.
CIC though bound by the IRB’s decision, can refuse the application on other grounds by appealing to the IAD.
If the sponsor is not satisfied with IRB’s decision, then the sponsor himself or the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration may apply to the Federal Court of Canada to allow a judicial review of the IRB’s decision.
The Federal Court of Canada may either dismiss this application or grant a re-hearing.

Sometimes, for appropriate cases, the IAD may suggest deciding the appeal through Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). Under such circumstances, the sponsor and the Minister’s counsel have to permission to sit down with the pre-assigned Dispute Resolution Officer (DRO) by the IAD, to agree on a decision. If the matter is resolved like this, a hearing is not required.

As a sponsor, you may not appeal for a family member who is inadmissible to Canada due to the following reasons:

Committing of a serious and punishable criminal offence and as a result of which, having served a term of imprisonment for two years or more.
Participation in an organized crime
Security grounds
Human/international rights violation
Misrepresentation

B. Appeal for residency obligation rejection

As per the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) all permanent residents of Canada are required to be physically present in Canada for at least 730 days out of every five years. If found in contradiction to the IRPA by a visa officer the person’s PR status can be curbed. In this case, the person may appeal the CIC decision to the IAD of the IRB within 60 days from the date of the receiving of the decision letter from CIC.

The appellant can be outside Canada. But if he/she was in Canada at any time over the past 365 days, CIC must put forth his/her travel document to enable him/her to travel to Canada. In other cases, the appellant may himself appy to the IAD for a travel document. The appellant might have to be present at the hearing in person if the IAD issues such an order. After that, the CIC will provide a travel document to allow the appellant to travel to Canada for the hearing. However, if the document is not issued, the hearing may be held by telephonic.

A member will hear the appeal according to the IRB tribunal process. There are two parties involved, namely, the appellant and Minister’s counsel representing the CIC. The hearing is generally public so that media or members of the public may attend it and be able to report.

In case the appeal is rejected by the IAD, then the appellant or Minister’s counsel are allowed to apply for a permission from the Federal Court of Canada to provide a judicial review of the IAD’s decision. The Federal Court of Canada would either dismiss the application or return the case to the IAD for re-hearing.
C. Appeal against removal order to Immigration Appeal Division

The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) provides that permanent residents, protected persons and foreign nationals who are in possession of a permanent resident visa all have the right to appeal removal orders against them. In addition, the IRPA provides for a ground of appeal which applies only to permanent residents. The appeal is not against a removal order although it may result in the Immigration Appeal Division (IAD) making a removal order. The appeal is against a decision made by an officer outside Canada that a permanent resident does not meet the residency obligation found in section 28 of the IRPA.

What are removal orders?

Notwithstanding the general principle that permanent residents have the right to enter and remain in Canada, those rights are not absolute. Removal orders may be made against permanent residents if they are found inadmissible on any of a number of grounds: security, violating human or international rights, serious criminality, organized criminality, misrepresentation, failure to comply with any conditions imposed by the regulations or failure to comply with the residency obligation in IRPA.

In accordance with subsection 44(2) of IRPA, a permanent resident may be ordered removed only by the Immigration Division and not by the Minister, except in the case of a breach of the residency obligation.

Jurisdictional issues

A permanent resident enjoys a right of appeal to the Immigration Appeal Division (IAD) unless the removal order is base d on one of the first four grounds listed above. Thus there are two jurisdictional issues. The first one is whether the appellant is a permanent resident as defined in the IRPA. The question of determining whether a person is or is not a permanent resident is fundamental to the exercise of the board’s jurisdiction. The second issue is whether an appeal to the IAD is barred because the Immigration Division found the permanent resident inadmissible on one of the grounds enumerated in subsection 64(1) of the IRPA: security, violating human or international rights, serious criminality, or organized criminality.

Loss of Permanent Resident Status

Once acquired, permanent resident status can be lost in certain circumstances.

Subsection 46(1) of the IRPA sets out the four ways in which permanent residents can lose their status:

ƒ
If they become Canadian citizens
On a final determination of a decision made outside of Canada that they have failed to comply with the residency obligation under section 28 of IRPA
When a removal order made against them comes into force
On a final determination under section 109 to vacate a decision to allow their claim for refugee protection or a final determination under subsection 114(3) to vacate a decision to allow their application for protection

Return to Canada for appeal

After a removal order is made against a permanent resident, they may leave Canada while their appeal is pending. In the case of a decision made outside Canada on the residency obligation, they may already be outside Canada.

Permanent residents do not lose their status until there has been a final determination of their appeal of their removal order. Also, permanent residents do not lose their status when a decision is made outside Canada that they do not meet the residency obligation. It is only when there has been a final determination of that decision that they lose their status. Therefore an appellant may be able to return to Canada as a permanent resident during the appeal process. In cases where an appellant has returned to Canada and the appeal under s. 63(4) is dismissed the IAD must issue a removal order, i.e. a departure order.

Canada Proposed Immigration Rule changes

CANADA 10 PROPOSED IMMIGRATION REFORMS EXPECTED FROM NEW PRIME MINISTER AND HIS IMMIGRATION REFUGEES AND CITIZENSHIP MINISTER TO BENEFITS ALL IMMIGRANTS

10 Proposed Liberal Reforms to Canada’s Immigration System

Double the number of immigration applications allowed for parents and grand-parents sponsorship from 5,000 to 10,000 visas per year.
Double the budget for processing family class immigration applications to reduce wait times
Increase points allocation to applicants who have siblings in Canada on their Express Entry application
Lift the visa requirement for Mexican travel to Canada.
Eliminate the $1000 Labour Market Impact Assessment fee for families seeking caregivers to care for family members with physical or mental disabilities.
Restoring free access to healthcare for refugee/asylum seekers pending a decision on their case by the government.
They have pledged to make it easier for international students to achieve Canadian Citizenship. The exact details are not specified, but they have stated they will do this by making adjustments to the Canadian Experience Class program that will ‘remove barriers’ to international students.
Restore the Canadian Citizenship residency time credit for international students in Canada.
Bypass the two year wait period for “conditional permanent residence” for spouses of sponsored individuals.
Restore the maximum age for dependents from 19 to 22, making it easier for immigrants to bring their older children to Canada.

CANADA 10 REASONS TO IMMIGRATE TO THIS COUNTRY

CANADA 10 REASONS TO IMMIGRATE TO THIS COUNTRY WITH 250,000 ARRIVING EVERY YEAR UNDER VARIOUS PROGRAM

Canada remains one of the most popular expat destinations with over 650,000 Brits currently calling it home. With wide-open spaces and safe, affluent cities, the benefits of living in the Great White North are clear. Canada is one of the most safe, secure and happy nations on the planet with numerous additional perks from polar bears to the Northern Lights. Thousands of Britons make the move across the Atlantic every year and if you’re looking for a new home overseas, here are 10 indisputable reasons to move to Canada:
Safe and Sound

Canada’s low crime rate is envied around the world, particularly amongst its southern neighbours. Violent crime is extremely rare and gun ownership is almost four times lower than the US. This has boosted Canada’s global reputation and in 2014, the OECD Better Life Index awarded Canada an impressive 9.7 out of 10 for safety and security. Gun ownership is lower partly because Canadians simply feel safer. The process of obtaining a license and firearm is also lengthy and stringent, particularly when compared to the US.
Education Matters

Canada values education and has long ensured all young citizens have access to the best schooling available no matter what their background. The government spends more per capita on education than other country in the world. As a result, Canadian children perform well across the board and, on average, stay in education longer than most other countries. This, in turn, has created a well informed, well paid society that still offers great career opportunities for skilled expats.
Multicultural Melting Pot

Canada’s Anglo-French culture was ingrained in the national identity from its conception. So, it is no surprise that today it is one of the most diverse nations in the world. 41 of Canada’s 338 members of parliament were born overseas ensuring tolerance and multiculturalism are promoted and protected at the heart of government.

You cannot walk down a street in Toronto or Vancouver without hearing a foreign tongue being spoken or catching the scent of some tempting international cuisine. For an expat, it is easy to settle into life in Canada as acceptance and respect are very much a part of national psyche. If you are willing to get out, meet new people and embrace your new country, Canada is ready to embrace you.
A Tolerant and Broad-Minded Society

Canada’s relaxed and liberal reputation is well earned. It has long been a pioneer of civil rights and was the first country outside Europe to legalized same sex marriage over a decade ago. Canada’s multicultural, diverse spirit is evident in both its forward thinking immigration policy and its zero tolerance approach to hate crimes and racial abuse. The OECD has even named it the best country in the world for acceptance and tolerance of minorities.

Canada has long realised the benefits skilled immigrants can bring to their country and, in particular, their economy. Their sensible and fair immigration policy gives anyone truly willing to make a successful life in Canada a good chance of achieving their goals. As a result, Canadians are able to travel the world relatively freely, safe in the knowledge that they will be welcomed wherever they go.
Economic Strength and Stability

The postcard images of spectacular lakes and mountains are undoubtedly alluring, but anyone moving overseas must consider the practical and financial benefits of any possible destination. Luckily, Canada has one of the strongest economies in the world and has a huge variety of career options for any ambitious expat.

Canada’s banking system is the bedrock of its strong, secure economy and has been voted the most stable on the planet for seven consecutive years by the World Economic Forum. This financial security allows Canada to offer a good quality of life for the vast majority of residents and has the second highest standard of living of all the G20 nations.
Universal Healthcare

Canada’s healthcare system is one of the fairest and most accessible in the world. Medical treatment is mostly free at the point of use and funded by government taxes. Each province is given a health budget to administer locally and issue health cards to all eligible residents allowing them to access healthcare.

Depending on which sort of visa you have, an expat may be granted a health card, but it is worth researching before hand in case you need to take out private insurance. There can be lengthy waiting times for some procedures, however this is a small price to pay for access to some of the best staff, facilities and treatment methods in the world.
Big and Beautiful

With almost 10 million square kilometres of stunning countryside, Canada is the second largest country in the world and undoubtedly one of the most beautiful. From ice bound artic tundra and snow sprinkled peaks to sparkling lakes and vast woodlands, Canada can take your breath away at every turn. Every weekend and holiday will be packed with skiing, whale watching, kayaking and hiking around this spectacular wilderness. For a more unique experience, how about swimming with a polar bear or sleeping in an ice hotel? You can do it all in Canada.

Toronto was recently named the fourth most attractive city in the world, proving that even the cities are pretty in Canada. With a relatively small population of just 35 million spread across this vast country, there’s plenty of room and reasonably priced housing almost everywhere.
Culinary Culture

Despite laying claim to the dubious honour of inventing the Hawaiian pizza, Canada actually has a surprisingly sophisticated culinary scene. In cities such as Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal you can find modern European restaurants such as Toqué and Canoe offering high end, fine dining, albeit with a laid back Canadian style.

Waves of immigration from Europe, Asia and South America have enhanced and enriched Canada’s restaurant scene. In most big cities you will find a huge variety of international cuisine, from Vietnamese and Thai to Iranian and Lebanese. At the other end of the scale, the national dish, Poutine, is a delicious combination of fries, gravy and cheese curds and is loved across the country.
Good Sense of Humour

While Canadians are generally a proud, patriotic bunch, they know not to take themselves too seriously. This laid back nation is known worldwide for its simple, straight-talking sense of humour. With notable comedians such as John Candy, Dan Aykroyd, Jim Carrey and Mike Myers all hailing from Canada, it’s clearly a funny place making this a key addition to our top 10 reasons to move to Canada list. Most Canadians will enjoy having a good laugh about anything from the weather to politics, but be sure not to joke about ice hockey as that is a deadly serious business.
Naturally Rich

Canada’s stable economy is built on the strong foundations of its natural wealth. As well a large income from the oil and gas industry, gold, copper, iron ore and uranium all contribute to the country’s impressive GDP. The rich central plains are ideal for farming and allow Canada to export substantial amounts of wheat and other cereals as well as wood and lumber products. Canada’s natural wealth has also benefitted its booming tourist industry as people flock from all over the world to see elk, polar bears and whales and perhaps even catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights.

With over 250,000 immigrants settling here every year, Canada is clearly an idyllic destination for any potential expat. There are far too many reasons to include but if these top 10 reasons to move to Canada have stirred your wanderlust, check out our Canada destination guide to find out more.

CANADA COMPLETE GUIDE FOR APPLYING STUDY PERMIT

CANADA COMPLETE GUIDE FOR APPLYING STUDY PERMIT BY INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Applying for Study Permit Outside Canada

Step 1. Gather Documents

Letter of acceptance from the Designated Learning Institution where you intend to study
Proof of financial support for the duration of your studies in Canada
Copy of your Marriage Certificate, if applicable
Two photos meeting the requirements
Passport copy of the information page
Any additional documents required by the responsible visa office

Step 2. Complete the Application

Step 3. Pay the fees

Application processing fee payment of CA$150 per person

Step 4. Submit the application

Visitor’s Visa – Visit Canada as a tourist

Step 1. Get the application package

Valid passport, must be one completely blank page other than the last page, available in each passport
Two photos meeting the requirements
Photocopy of your current immigration document, if applicable
Proof of financial support
Photocopy of your valid return ticket and/or travel itinerary, if applicable.
Minor travelling alone or with one parent: custody documents or a letter of authorization from the other non accompanying parent or a letter of authorization signed by both parents or legal guardians, if applicable.
Any additional documents required by the responsible visa office.

Step 2. Pay your application fees

Step 3. Submit your application

Step 4. Check processing time

Work as a co-op student or intern

Step 1. Determine how you will apply

Online or on paper

Step 2. Get application package

Photocopies of passport pages;
A final transcript; or
A letter from the institution; or
The formal notification of graduation;
Copy of the fee payment receipt showing the amount paid
Original letter provided by the institution stating that your intended employment is an essential part of your program of study (for co-op work permit)

Step 3. Complete application and attach necessary documents

Step 4. Submit application

Get a post-graduation work permit

To obtain a work permit after your graduation, you must meet the following requirements:

You must have studied full time in Canada and you must have completed a program of study that lasted at least eight months.
In addition, you must have graduated from:

a public post-secondary institution, such as a college, trade/technical school, university or CEGEP (in Quebec), or
a private post-secondary institution that operates under the same rules and regulations as public institutions, or
a Canadian private institution authorized by provincial statute to confer degrees but only if you are enrolled in one of the programs and not in all programs of study offered by the private institution

You must apply for a work permit within 90 days of receiving written confirmation (for example, a transcript or an official letter) from your institution indicating that you have met the requirements for completing your academic program
You must have completed and passed the program of study and received a notification that you are eligible to obtain your degree, diploma or certificate.
You must have a valid study permit when you apply for the work permit.

Step 1. Get the application package

Make sure you are eligible for the post-graduation work permit before you apply.

Step 2. Pay your application fees

Step 3. Submit your application

CANADA HIGH COMMISSION NEW DELHI INDIA VISA REPORT & REJECTIONS

CANADA HIGH COMMISSION NEW DELHI INDIA VISA REPORT(1)SKILLED WORKERS REJECTION RATE IS 70% DUE TO FRAUD DOCUMENTS (2)ONLY 569 PROVINCIAL NOMINEE APPLICANTS APPLIED IN 2014 DOWN FROM 1090 IN 2013(3)STUDY PERMIT REJECTION RATE IS 37%(4)33,700 APPLIED FOR TEMPORARY RESIDENT PERMIT WITH 94% APPROVAL RATE (5)5595 APPLIED UNDER GRAND PARENT AND PARENT VISA(

HERE are some other interesting facts from that report from New Delhi that is Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s largest overseas program:

* Skilled Workers: “The overall refusal rate for FSW [Federal Skilled Worker] applications is approximately 20% but misrepresentation as the reason for refusal accounts for 70% of this volume. The introduction of higher language benchmarks and the use of Educational Credential Assessments have resulted in stronger applicants.”

* Provincial Nominee: “Provincial Nominee applications have declined year over year to approximately half the intake, 1090 applications in 2013 to 569 in 2014. Low-skilled applications (NOC C&D) continue to have issues regarding employment and the ability of the applicant to perform the job duties, specifically for workers with and without job offers. Nominations from Manitoba continue to represent a large percentage of all applications at mission.”

* Parents and Grandparents: “The inventory decreased significantly from 9414 persons at the end of 2013, to 5595 persons at the end of 2014. This was a result of our sizeable target (5246 persons) for 2014. This number should continue to decline.” “Delhi’s FC4 [Family Class sponsorship applications for parents and grandparents] acceptance rate is 88.8%, however, this approval rate masks the reality that over-age children who do not qualify as dependents are routinely removed from applications and processing continues on the remaining eligible family members.”

* Temporary Resident: “Delhi has one of the largest temporary resident programs in the global network, finalizing over 124,000 applications in 2014.”

* Study Permits: “Potential pathways for migration to Canada and opportunities for off-campus and postgraduate employment are a significant draw. The approval rate in 2014 for college and non-university diploma study was just over 63% overall, reflecting the often weaker applications by applicants destined to lower-level programs.”

* TRV [Temporary Resident Visa]: “In July 2014, CIC formally launched the CAN+ program in India. The program reduces application requirements for persons in possession of a valid US visa or who have previously been issued Canadian visas. Over 33,700 CAN+ applications were finalized in New Delhi in 2014, with an approval rate of 94%.”

Study in Lithuania | Schengen Country | Without IELTS

Study in ‪#‎Lithuania‬ | ‪#‎Schengen‬ Country | Without ‪#‎IELTS‬

Courses:
‪#‎Bachelor‬ level:
* Administration of Rural Development (Social Sciences)
* Agricultural Mechanical Engineering (Technological Sciences)
* Hydraulic Engineering (Technological Sciences)

‪#‎Master‬ level:
* Accounting and Finance (Social Sciences);
* Agricultural Mechanical Engineering (Technological Sciences);
* Agrobiotechnology (Technological Sciences);
* Hydraulic Engineering (Technological Sciences)

‪#‎Fees‬: ‪#‎EUR1700‬ – EUR 5800Per ‪#‎Annum‬

Bachelor level programmes in Biomedical Sciences:
* Applied Ecology
* Forestry
* Urban and Recreational Forestry

Bachelor level programmes in Social Sciences:
* Agricultural Economics
* Agricultural Business Management
* Logistics and Trade

Bachelor level programmes in Technological Sciences:
* Engineering of Agroenergetics
* Transport Engineering
* Hydraulic Engineering

Master level programmes in Biomedical Sciences:
* Applied Ecology
* Forestry
* Wildlife Management
* Urban and Recreational Forestry
* Horticulture

Master level programmes in Social Sciences:
* Administration of Rural Development
* Agricultural Business Management
* Logistics and Business

Master level programmes in Technological Sciences:
* Engineering of Agroenergetics
* Biomass Engineering
* Hydraulic Engineering

PhD level programmes in Biomedical Sciences:
* Agronomy
* Forest Sciences
* Ecology and Environmental Studies

PhD level programmes in Social Sciences:
* Management and Administration
* Economics

PhD level programmes in Technological Sciences:
* Mechanical Engineering
* Transport Engineering
* Environmental Engineering and Land Management

Docs Required:
-Filled up from
-Passport
-Educational Docs
-EUR 250 Application fees

Intake date: 01 Feb 2016

Last date for Submission of Docs: 15 Nov 2015

Call Ankur @ +91 98141 19001 for more details

Australia Spouse Visa FAQ’s

AUSTRALIA MARRIAGE VISA 22 QUESTIONS AND THEIR ANSWERS KNOWN AS SUBCLASS 309/310 VISAS AND PROSPECTIVE MARRIAGE VISA SUBCLASS 300

The Q&A below covers subclass 309/100 visas and prospective marriage visa subclass 300

Can I lodge my partner visa application in Australia?
You should enter Australia on an appropriate visa for your intended purpose and length of stay. If you are intending to move to Australia and live there permanently, you should obtain an appropriate migration visa before you go.

Please note: If you have a “no further stay” condition on your temporary visa, it may not be possible to apply for a further visa from within Australia.

How long will processing of my Partner application take?
The current expected processing time for Partner Migration at the Australian Embassy, Berlin is at least 10-14 months from the date you lodged your application – for most cases. Note that actual processing times will vary due to a variety of factors, and more complex cases which require an interview or referral of documents in relation to health and character requirements will take much longer.

The minimum processing time is based on the number of applications currently awaiting processing and the planning levels available in the family stream of the Australian migration program, which is set by the Australian Government each year.

The department currently receives more applications than there are places available in the family stream of the migration program. This means that there is some increase in processing times for these visas. It is therefore recommended that you do not take any irreversible action during the processing of your application, such as ceasing employment, selling property or purchasing airline tickets.

Can my application be processed sooner?
Applications are processed in the order they are received and there is little scope to process applications earlier. If you feel you have compelling or compassionate reasons why your application should be processed earlier, please provide a written statement to your case officer outlining those circumstances. It should be noted that as a general policy, circumstances such as employment in Australia; schooling for children; pregnancy; selling your house; or separation from your partner is not considered compelling or compassionate.

What documents should I provide as evidence of identity and marital status?
You should provide certified copies of the usual documents of identity that are required in your country of birth (or residence, where relevant), which must be translated into English if they are not in English already.

If available in your country, you may also provide multilingual or international civil status records, (for example birth, marriage, death certificates) providing English is one of the languages on the record.

Some European countries will also provide an extract of the population register instead of a birth certificate, and this is acceptable if it includes details of your parents, and is translated into English or in English.

You should include certified copies of your bio data page of passport or travel document. Please ensure the copies are high quality colour copies.

Certified copies
Some of the documents you need to submit for your partner migration visa application have to be submitted as certified copies. ‘Certified copies’ are copies authorised, or stamped as being true copies of originals, by a person or agency recognised by the law of the country in which you currently reside. The appropriate certifying authorities vary from country to country. Some country specific information is available.

Translations
Original documents in languages other than English must be accompanied by an English translation. The English translations must be appropriately endorsed translations. In Australia, translators must be accredited by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters. Their accreditation details must be recorded on the translation. Translations provided by non-accredited translators outside Australia should be endorsed by the translator with their full name, address, telephone number, and details of their qualifications and experience in the language being translated.

Will you confirm receipt of my documents?
To confirm receipt of your documents, it is recommended you send them via courier or registered mail. As a general practice, we will not confirm receipt of your documents.

What evidence should the sponsor provide regarding Australian citizenship or permanent residence
As evidence of your sponsor’s Australian citizenship you should submit a certified copy of the bio data page of his/her passport, Australian citizenship certificate or Australian birth certificate. If your sponsor is a permanent resident of Australia, please submit a certified copy of his or her passport.

My children are Australian citizens – do I need to include them in my migration application?
If your children are Australian citizens they cannot be granted a visa and should travel to Australia on an Australian passport. When you complete the application form 47SP you should declare all of your children on the form, but children who are Australian citizens are not included as applicants and should be marked as ‘not migrating’ even if they will be accompanying you to Australia.

Relationship evidence
Every relationship is different and we may need different kinds of documents to make an assessment of your application. Your case officer will contact you once he/she has made an assessment of the submitted documents and if further documentation is necessary. For further information on the kind of documents you should normally include in your application, please use the step-by-step guide on our webpage.

We have not lived together for 12 months, but would like to apply for a de facto partner visa – is that okay?
To be granted a Partner visa as a de facto partner (opposite-sex or same-sex), you and your sponsor must show that you have been in a committed de facto relationship for the entire 12 months immediately prior to lodging your application.
Note that this 12 month period is assessed from the time the relationship became a de facto partner relationship, and not from the time you first met.

Please read Fact Sheet 35 “One-Year Relationship Requirement” before you lodge your application to determine whether this is the correct visa category for you.

I want to apply for a de facto partner visa, but I’m still married to someone else. Is that a problem?
To apply for a Partner visa as a de facto partner (opposite-sex or same-sex), you and your partner must show that you have been in a de facto partner relationship for the entire 12 months immediately prior to lodging your application and that this relationship was to the exclusion of all others. If either you or your sponsor are still married to another person at the time of lodgement of a de facto partner visa, you will need to provide evidence that your previous relationship is no longer ongoing.

What if the sponsor has sponsored someone to Australia before?
Sponsorship limitations: You may not be able to sponsor your partner if you have previously sponsored 2 other partners for migration to Australia; or have sponsored another partner within the last 5 years or were sponsored as a partner yourself within the last 5 years;
You may still be permitted to sponsor your partner in compelling circumstances, such as:
If your previous partner has died or abandoned the relationship leaving young children;
if your relationship with your current partner is long standing; or if you and your partner have children of your relationship.

Note that this cannot be assessed prior to lodgement of an application.

When should I do the required medical examinations?
Medical examination(s) with a panel doctor approved by the Australian Government will be requested as the assessment of your application progresses, and you will be given the relevant details at that time.

Can I do the medical examination with my own doctor?
No. Under no circumstances can we accept a medical examination conducted by a private doctor who has not been approved by the Australian Government.

How long is a Prospective Marriage, subclass 300, visa valid for?
A subclass 300 Prospective Marriage visa is valid for 9 months from date of grant. You must marry the sponsor within the validity of the visa.

What if I get married while you are processing my Prospective Marriage (subclass 300) visa?
If you marry your partner before your Prospective Marriage visa is finalised there is a provision for you to be considered for a Partner visa without the need for you to lodge a new application. Please advise your case officer of your change of circumstances and you will be given further information at that time.

Can I travel to Australia while my Partner visa application is being processed?
You may apply for other visas while your migration application is being processed. This will be assessed against the criteria for that visa subclass and will not affect the assessment of your migration application. Further information on other visas to Australia can be found on our website,www.border.gov.au.

Please be aware that if you enter Australia on a one way ticket you may be asked by Australian immigration authorities, on arrival at the airport, about your plans for departing Australia. If entering Australia on an ETA or Tourist visa the immigration officer will need to be satisfied that you are a genuine visitor. You would need to explain your intentions to the officer so that the officer is satisfied that you do not intend to stay beyond the period which your visa allows. This also applies if you have an ongoing application for a partner visa.

If your travel to Australia results in you spending a cumulative period of 12 months or more in Australia in the last 10 years, you will need to provide an Australian Federal Police (AFP) check before your visa can be granted. For further information, please see the following website:

Can my Partner visa be granted while I am in Australia?
No. If you have lodged your partner visa outside Australia, it is a legal requirement that you also be outside Australia at the time of visa grant. If you are in Australia when your visa is ready for grant, you will need to depart. You can depart for any country in the world and you should spend at least 4 working days outside Australia to allow for processing of your visa. Working days do not include Saturday, Sunday or Public Holidays. You should keep your case officer informed of your contact details.

After my visa is granted, do I have to travel to Australia by a certain date? What is the initial entry date?
Yes. When your visa has been granted, you will be advised of your ‘initial entry date’ and it is a condition of your visa that you enter before that date. The date is based on the expiry date of your health and character checks which are generally valid for 12 months from the date they were issued. If you fail to enter Australia by the initial entry date you visa may be considered for cancellation, unless you have compelling reasons for not meeting that condition.

It is not possible to change the initial entry date on the visa after it has been granted.

What is two stage Partner processing?
Applying for a Partner visa is a 2-stage process. You apply for a provisional (subclass 309) and permanent (subclass 100) visa at the same time. If you meet all the initial criteria, you will be granted a provisional Partner visa. This visa remains valid until a decision is made on your permanent visa application, which is generally 2 years after you initially applied for your visa. If you continue to meet all legal requirements, you will be granted a permanent subclass 100 Partner visa, usually after your arrival in Australia.

Can I get a permanent Partner (subclass 100) visa without waiting the 2 years?
The two year waiting period can be waived if:
– at the time you apply, you have been in a Partner relationship with your partner for 3 years or more, or 2 years or more if there are children from your relationship.

Please note that the three year period is assessed from the time you started a committed married or de facto relationship with your partner, and NOT from the time that you first met or formed a casual relationship.

Your case officer will assess the evidence and documentation provided with your application to determine if you meet the requirements for waiver of the two year period. If you are granted the provisional subclass 309 visa, after two years you will be contacted by a case officer with regard to the assessment of your application for the permanent subclass 100 visa. This will be granted if you continue to meet the relationship requirements and other legal criteria.

Subclass 489 – Australia | Checklist and Requirements

AUSTRALIA VISA SUBCLASS 489 SKILLED REGIONAL (PROVISIONAL)DOCUMENTS CHECKLIST OR REQUIRED FOR IMMIGRANTS LOOKING TO APPLY THIS VISA

Subclass 489 Document Checklist Invited Pathway

You must provide documents to support your application for this visa. The department can make a decision on your application using just the information you provide when you lodge your application. It is in your interest to provide as much information as possible with your application.

All supporting documents should be scanned and uploaded with your application. All documents that you provide must be certified copies of original documents. Do not include original documents unless specifically requested to do so by the department. Documents not in English must be accompanied by accredited English translations.

Information to help you prepare your application and guidelines on attaching documents to an online visa application might assist you to lodge your online application.

Use this checklist to make sure your application is complete.
At time of invitation

You must provide evidence you met the following threshold requirements at the time of invitation.

Evidence you have at least competent English. This evidence can include one of the following:
You hold a valid passport issued by the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Canada, New Zealand or the Republic of Ireland and you are a citizen of that country.
You have achieved a score of at least 6 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) test that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
You have achieved a score of at least ‘B’ in each of the four test components of an Occupational English Test (OET) that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
You have achieved the following minimum test scores in each of the four test components: 12 for listening, 13 for reading, 21 for writing and 18 for speaking, in a Test of English as a Foreign Language internet-based test (TOEFL iBT) test that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
You have achieved a test score of at least 50 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
You have achieved a test score of at least 169 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) test that has been undertaken on or after 1 January 2015 and prior to lodging the visa application.

If you are seeking to demonstrate proficient English or superior English for the points test, you must submit the results of a specified English language test even if you hold one of the passports specified above.

A suitable skills assessment assessed by the relevant assessing authority for your nominated occupation from the relevant Skilled Occupation List.
You were under 50 years of age. Your personal documents are counted as evidence.
Evidence that you need to provide to support your Points Test claims made in your Expression of Interest (EOI). Evidence you need to provide is available below. Your assessed points score must be equal to or greater than the points score you claimed in your EOI.
State or territory Government agency nomination through SkillSelect or Sponsorship by an eligible family member living in a designated area of Australia.

Forms

Form 1393 Electronic application form (online form link provided in your letter of invitation)

Charges

Pay the visa application charge.
Pay any second instalments of the visa application charge, if applicable.

Documents to show identity

Scanned colour copies of the biographical pages of the current passports or travel documents of all people included in the application.
Recent, scanned passport-sized photograph (45 mm x 35 mm) of you and each other person included in the application. Alternatively, digital photos can also be provided. Each photograph should:
be of the head and shoulders against a plain background and
be labelled with the applicant’s name.
If your name has changed or the name of anyone included in your application has changed:
evidence of the name change.
Scanned colour copy of your birth registration, and that of all people included in the application, showing the names of both parents. If you do not have a birth certificate, provide a certified scanned colour copy of the identification pages of at least one of the following:
passport
family book showing both parents’ names
identification document issued by the government
document issued by a court that verifies the person’s identity
other acceptable evidence that you are who you claim to be.

Your family relationships
Spouse or de facto partner

If you are married or in a de facto relationship, provide evidence of a genuine and continuing relationship with your partner at the exclusion of all others.
If you are married provide a scanned colour copy of marriage certificate or relationship registration for you and your partner
For de facto relationships this should include evidence that you have been in the relationship for at least 12 months at time of application. Evidence can include, but is not limited to, joint bank account statements, billing accounts in joint names, other evidence of cohabitation etc).
If you or anyone included in the application has been widowed, divorced or is permanently separated: a certified scanned colour copy of the relevant death certificate, divorce decree absolute, or statutory declaration/separation certificate.

Children

Copies of birth certificates or the family book showing the names of both parents for each dependent child included in the application.
For all children included in the application aged 18 years or older, provide a scanned colour copy of:
their full birth certificate to evidence their relationship to you
evidence of their current or recent formal studies
evidence of financial dependency on you
a completed Form 47A
If any dependent child included in the application is adopted include scanned colour copies of the adoption papers.
If you have included a child under 18 years of age in the application, and that child’s other parent is not included in the application you must provide documentary evidence that you have the legal right to include that child in your application, such as:
copies of official legal documents, such as a court-issued custody, access or guardianship order
Form 1229 Consent form to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years (125 KB PDF file). If you use this form, you will have to attach a certified copy of the other parent’s government issued identification document (such as a passport or driver’s licence) with their photograph and a signature.

Other dependent relatives

For all other dependent relatives included in your application:

completed Form 47A
evidence of the relationship between this applicant and you or your spouse (birth and marriage certificates, etc)
evidence that this relative lives in your household
evidence your relative has been financially dependent on you for at least the 12 months immediately before you lodge your application
if your relative has been widowed, divorced or is permanently separated a copy of any relevant death certificate, divorce decree absolute, or statutory declaration/separation certificate.

Character requirements

Police checks for you and everyone included in your application, whether they are migrating or not, who is at least 16 years of age. You must provide a scanned colour copy:
of an Australian National Police Check for anyone who has spent a total of 12 months or more in Australia since turning 16 years of age
of police certificates from each country in which anyone in your application has spent a total of 12 months or more in the past 10 years since turning 16 years of age.
If you or anyone included in the application has served in the armed forces of any country:
certified scanned colour copy of military service record or discharge papers.

Family member English language ability

For each of your dependent applicants who are 18 years or older at the time of application must provide evidence of having Functional English. If the applicant does not have evidence of having Functional English, you will need to provide a statement indicating your intention to pay the second instalment of the visa application charge.

Points test

Evidence to support your claims made against each relevant criterion on the Points Test should be scanned, certified where required and uploaded with your online application.

Age: Proof of age such as a copy of your birth certificate or passport. Your personal documents are counted as evidence and in most cases you will not need to provide more documents.

English language ability: The results of specified English language test that you took in the three years immediately before lodging your application. You need to ensure you are able to provide evidence of the level of your English language ability attained at time of invitation. You will need to provide your English language test result as evidence of your English language ability.

You only need to provide the Test Report Form (TRF) Number or the test registration number that is on your English language test certificate.
Skilled employment: evidence of working full-time in skilled employment in the 10 years before you were invited to apply, such as:
employment references
contracts, pay slips, tax returns, group certificates
evidence that you have been self-employed
any other documents that you provided to the relevant assessing authority to obtain your skills assessment, including any documents relating to your employment history.

Employment references must meet the following requirements:
be written on the official letterhead of the company or government department providing the reference;
the letterhead should indicate clearly the full address of the company and any telephone, fax numbers, e-mail and website addresses;
the name and position of the person authorised to sign the employment reference should be typed or stamped below that person’s signature;
the contact telephone number of the person writing the reference should be included in the letter;
the letter should indicate the exact period of employment (including whether permanent or temporary, full or part-time), position(s) held, the duties undertaken and the salary earned – positions should not be described by generic titles (eg. research officer, public servant) but according to the nature of the duties undertaken (eg. research chemist, accounts clerk); and
a payslip from your current employment should also be included – this is especially important from applicants working in government departments.

Qualifications: evidence of your qualifications, such as certified copies of:
degrees, diplomas, certificates and course transcripts
any other documents you provided to the relevant assessing authority to support your qualification claims.

Australian study requirement: evidence that you have completed one or more degrees, diplomas or trade qualifications for award by an Australian educational institution as a result of a course or courses:
that are registered courses;
that were completed in a total of at least 16 calendar months;
that were completed as a result of a total of at least 2 academic years study;
for which all instruction was conducted in English; and
that you undertook while in Australia as the holder of a visa authorising you to study.

Credentialled community language: evidence that you have been accredited at the paraprofessional level or above for interpreting or translating by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI).

Study in regional Australia: Obtain evidence that you have lived and studied in regional Australia/low population growth metropolitan areas:
you will need evidence of residency which spans the 2 year period – this will usually include documents such as rental agreements and gas, power and telephone bills; and
you may need to provide supplementary evidence of studying at a campus in regional Australia or a low population growth metropolitan area if your academic transcript does not identify the campus.

Partner skills:
your partner’s personal documents that prove they are under 50 years of age
evidence your partner has at least competent English at time of invitation. The evidence can include one of the following:
They hold a valid passport issued by the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Canada, New Zealand or the Republic of Ireland and they are a citizen of that country.
They have achieved a score of at least 6 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) test that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
They have achieved a score of at least ‘B’ in each of the four test components of an Occupational English Test (OET) that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
They have achieved the following minimum test scores in each of the four test components: 12 for listening, 13 for reading, 21 for writing and 18 for speaking, in a Test of English as a Foreign Language internet-based test (TOEFL iBT) test that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
They have achieved a test score of at least 50 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic conducted in the three years immediately test that has been undertaken in the three years immediately prior to lodging the visa application.
You have achieved a test score of at least 169 in each of the four test components (speaking, reading, listening and writing) in a Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) test that has been undertaken on or after 1 January 2015 and prior to lodging the visa application.

a suitable skills assessment from the relevant assessing authority for your partner’s nominated occupation (which must be on the same skilled occupations list as your nominated occupation).

Professional year in Australia: documents that prove you completed a specified professional year of 12 months in Australia in the four years before you were invited to apply.

Sponsorship by an eligible relative living in a designated area of Australia

Documents to prove your sponsor is an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen.
For Australian citizens—a certified copy of their citizenship certificate or, if born in Australia, their full birth certificate.
For Australian permanent residents—a certified copy of their visa or the biographical page in their passport or their visa grant letter.
For an eligible New Zealand citizen—a certified copy of their certificate issued under the Social Security Act 1991. Eligible New Zealand citizens may also need to meet health and character requirements. The department will advise.
Documents to prove your relationship to you sponsor. Acceptable documents include certified copies of:
birth certificates
marriage certificates
family registers
school records.
Certified copies of any name change (for example by deed poll or marriage), if applicable, for your sponsor.
Documents to prove your sponsor lives in a designated area of Australia. Acceptable documents include certified copies of:
property titles
leases
invoices for items such as telephone, gas, electricity that show a date and your sponsor’s name and address.

Canada Refusal Reasons – Visitor Visa

CANADA 10 POSSIBLE REASONS FOR REFUSAL OF VISITOR VISA

The person/s applying for a temporary visa in Canada should able to meet the criteria of the immigration regulations and acts of Canada and that the applicant is not inadmissible, and able meet the visa conditions and satisfy the visa officer in assessing the application as a whole that the applicant seeking an entry in Canada will leave Canada at the end of his/her visit.

You have previously travelled to Canada and its conditions were not met Or you have travelled to other countries and that you have violated the immigration rules or land law soil of that country

You have no legal immigration status of the country you’ve currently been applying for an entry to Canada

No strong ties were established in your country of residence, that would motivate your return incentives or, your potential circumstances in Canada i.e. Family ties

No clear purpose as to why you need to travel in Canada, its duration and credibility in support to your application

You are not well established in your country of residence in particular of your professional work and or employment status
You don’t have enough financial resources to cover your propose travel to Canada, or no guarantee of you not abandoning your country resident, essential docs to present contrary to this could be your personal assets and your current financial status If the person is applying for a business visit visa, and failed to support his/her claim that his intention is genuine for the purpose sought in Canada

You did not properly provide the correct information needed in your application and or you withhold some infos which are material for your application

No sufficient funding as to cover your entire travel If you are being sponsored by a host in Canada to cover some expenses of your travel, yet you have not supplied the documents deemed to be credible enough to convince the visa officer

When there is a forged document/fabricated that automatically confer for the refusal and inadmissible to Canada

Unable to comply with the additional in formations being requested by the visa office in a prescribed period of time

Understanding this list may or may not increase your chances of your approval rate to get your temporary visa application to be approved, but this is not an exhaustive list to follow as it may still vary on the individual circumstances of the applicant, evidentiary documents supplied to the embassy and for a possible decision on what other grounds may find by the VO to your application.

‪#‎Australia‬ ‪#‎Student‬ ‪#‎Visa‬ upcoming ‪#‎changes‬ in the ‪#‎next_year‬:

‪#‎Australia‬ ‪#‎Student‬ ‪#‎Visa‬ upcoming ‪#‎changes‬ in the ‪#‎next_year‬:

AUSTRALIA STUDENT VISA 3 CHANGES COMING NEXT YEAR LIKE(1)ONLY TWO CATEGORIES OF VISA INSTEAD OF PRESENT 8 CATEGORIES AND IN TWO CATEGORIES ONE FOR STUDENT AND ANOTHER FOR GUARDIAN TO ACCOMPANY IF STUDENT AGE IS BELOW 18 YEARS(3)STREAMLINED VISA PROCESSING (SVP) TO BE ABOLISHED (3)THREE CATEGORIES OF RISK ASSESSMENT DEPENDING UPON NATIONALITIES TO BE REDUCED TO ONE CATEGORY
(FOREIGN STUDENT RECRUITMENT AGENTS WILL ALSO NEED REGISTRATION AND TO MEET CODE OF ETHICS BEFORE REPRESENTING ANY UNIVERSITIES OR COLLEGE IN AUSTRALIA)
2ND SEPTEMBER 2015
The Abbott government places high importance on Australia’s international education sector.
It is our largest services export and a key pillar of the country’s economic growth and future prosperity.
International students bring many benefits to Australia, economically and culturally, and will always be welcome in our country.
Since coming to office the government has made it a priority to rebuild the international education sector and undo the damage caused by Labor when the export value of the sector fell by $1.8 billion during the three-year period to 2012-13. Under the Coalition the sector has rebounded strongly and, based on preliminary figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, grown by $3.5bn to a record high of $18.1bn in 2014-15.
This strong performance is just the beginning. In April, Education Minister Christopher Pyne released Australia’s first draft national strategy for international education.
The strategy sets an ambitious whole-of-government agenda for the sustainable growth of Australia’s international education ­sector.
Student visa settings are an important component of Australia’s international education strategy.
It is vital that visa settings are competitive and that the process of obtaining a visa is as simple as possible for genuine students.
It is also highly important that the visa program maintains high levels of immigration integrity.
To this end, on June 16 the government announced the introduction of a simplified student visa framework, to start mid next year.
Key reforms under the SSVF include a reduction in the number of student visa subclasses from eight to two — one student visa and a student guardian visa — and the introduction of a simplified single immigration risk framework for all international students.
The SSVF will mean a broader, simpler, fairer framework for international students and Australian education providers.
It will benefit Australia’s international education sector through reduced red tape, a visa framework that is simpler to navigate and a more targeted approach to immigration integrity.
Under the SSVF students no longer will be subject to the complexity of the present process, which requires them to determine the correct visa subclass to apply for and which risk framework — either the assessment level framework or streamlined visa processing — they will be assessed against.
Instead, students will apply for a single student visa subclass and be assessed under a single immigration risk framework.
The single immigration risk framework will guide a student’s financial and English language evidentiary requirements based on the immigration risk outcomes of their country of citizenship and intended education provider.
Where the combination of these factors indicates lower risk, the student will have ‘‘streamlined evidentiary requirements’’ and generally will not need to provide evidence of financial and English language capacity with their visa application.
Based on modelling from 2013-14, about 85 per cent of students would have streamlined evidentiary requirements under the SSVF. Importantly, these efficiencies will be achieved without compromising the integrity of the student visa program.
The SSVF also will benefit education providers considerably.
Although the existing student visa program arrangements have contributed to strong levels of growth, these arrangements also have created perceived market inequalities and high levels of red tape.
The SSVF will address these issues by creating a more level playing field for education providers and by unwinding many of the burdensome requirements imposed on providers by SVP.
The SSVF represents an exciting opportunity to build on Australia’s international competitive­ness and the government is working closely with the ­international education sector to ensure that it is implemented ­effectively.
A strong international education sector means more Australian jobs and broader benefits for the community.
The SSVF will have a key role to play in the ­future success of this important sector.

Canada Spouse Visa Guide

CANADA COMPLETE GUIDE FOR SPONSORING YOUR SPOUSE TO CANADA

Sponsoring your spouse
Love knows no borders and to shorten the distance between you and your significant other there is a specific procedure for sponsoring your spouse to come Canada.

Who can you sponsor?

Spouse, a legal marriage partner valid under the Canadian law and if performed outside of Canada, valid under the laws of the jurisdiction where it took place. Includes both opposite- and same-sex relationships.
Common-law partner, a person, regardless of the sex, with whom you have been cohabiting in a conjugal relationship for at least one year. The term refers to opposite-sex and same-sex relationships
Conjugal partner, a person with whom you have been in a genuine relationship, for at least one year, where a significant degree of attachment exists, implying a physical and mutually interdependent relationship, that due to verifiable barriers, such as sexual orientation, religious faith, etc., marriage or cohabitation has not been possible.

Eligibility
Sponsor

Canadian citizen, Registered Indian or permanent resident
At least 18 years of age
Live in Canada or, if living outside, provide evidence that you will live in Canada once the person you are sponsoring becomes a permanent resident.
Sign an agreement with your spouse or common-law partner confirming that each of you understands your obligations and responsibilities,
Sign an undertaking promising to provide for your spouse or common-law partner’s basic requirements and, if applicable, those of his or her dependent children,
Prove that you have sufficient income to provide basic requirements for your spouse or common-law partner’s dependent children. To do this, you must provide documents showing your financial resources for the past 12 months. This requirement applies only when dependent children who have dependent children of their own are included on the application.

Partner

At least 18 years of age
Live in or outside Canada. If in Canada, they do not need to have legal status.
Sign an agreement with your spouse or common-law partner confirming that each of you understands your obligations and responsibilities
Agree to have medical, criminal and background checks.
May have to get a police certificate in their home country.

Responsibilities

When agreeing to be a sponsor, a contract called an undertaking with the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration must signed.

The undertaking is an unconditional promise to provide financial support for your spouse or common-law partner’s basic requirements and those of his or her dependent children; requirements such as food, clothing, utilities, personal requirements, shelter, fuel, household supplies, and health care not provided by public health. The undertaking ensures the sponsored people do not have to apply for social assistance.

The length of undertaking is three years after your spouse or your common-law, conjugal partner or their over 19 dependent children become a permanent resident; if the dependent children are under the age of 19 the length will be of 10 years or until the children turn 22 years old, whichever happens first. The obligations as a sponsor begin as soon as the sponsored people arrive in Canada.
Conditional Permanent Residence

Spouses, common-law or conjugal partners who are in a relationship with their sponsor for two years or less and have no children in common with their sponsor at the time of the sponsorship application are subject to a period of conditional permanent residence. The condition requires the sponsored spouse or partner to cohabit in a conjugal relationship with their sponsor for a period of two years after the day on which they became a permanent resident.
The process

1. Gather the documents listed in the IMM 5491 checklist; translations and certified copies may be required.

2. Carefully and honestly fill out the following applications:

Application to Sponsor, Sponsorship Agreement and Undertaking (IMM 1344)
Document Checklist (IMM 5491)
Sponsorship Evaluation (IMM 5481)
Sponsor Questionnaire: (IMM 5540)
Statutory Declaration of Common-law Union (IMM 5409), if applicable
Use of a Representative (IMM 5476), if applicable
Receipt (IMM 5401)

3. Pay the fees, they must be paid in CAN

table sponGo here for fees on dependent children

4. Submit the application.

The application will go through a thorough process comprised of three phases:

Completeness check
Eligibility review
Selection and Admissibility

Australia Family Visas

AUSTRALIA GUIDE FOR VARIOUS CATEGORIES OF FAMILY VISAS

Explore your family visa options

Family visas that allow you to live and work in Australia are available in a range of individual categories, including spouse visas, parent visas and child visas. Both permanent and temporary visas are available.

Please browse through the list below to explore some of your visa options:
Spouse visas

Prospective Marriage visa (subclass 300)

This visa allows people to come to Australia to marry their prospective spouse. It is a temporary visa that is valid for nine months.

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you intend to marry:

an Australian citizen
an Australian permanent resident
an eligible New Zealand citizen

Partner (Provisional) visa (subclass 309) and Partner (Migrant) visa (subclass 100)

This visa allows the spouse or de facto partner of an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen to travel to and live in Australia. The Partner (Provisional) visa (subclass 309) is the first stage towards a permanent Partner visa (subclass 100).

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you are married to or in a de facto relationship with an:

Australian citizen
Australian permanent resident
eligible New Zealand citizen

Partner visa (subclasses 820 and 801)

This visa allows the spouse or de facto partner of an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia. The temporary Partner visa (subclass 820) is the first stage towards a permanent Partner visa (subclass 801).

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you are married to or in a de facto relationship with an:

Australian citizen
Australian permanent resident
eligible New Zealand citizen

Child visas

Child visa (subclass 101)

This is a permanent residence visa that allows a child who is outside Australia to come to Australia to live with their parents.

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you are:

applying outside Australia
sponsored by an eligible parent

Parent visas

Aged Parent visa (subclass 804)

This visa lets older parents live permanently in Australia if their child is an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen who is settled in Australia.

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you:

are in Australia
are sponsored
meet age requirements
meet the balance-of-family test
are prepared to wait in a queue before your visa can be approved

Contributory Parent visa (subclass 143)

This visa lets parents of an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen live permanently in Australia.

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you:

are sponsored or
hold a temporary Contributory Parent visa (subclass 173)
meet the balance-of-family test
are prepared to pay higher visa application charges for faster processing

Parent visa (subclass 103)

This visa lets parents live permanently in Australia if their child is an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen who is settled in Australia.

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you:

are sponsored
meet the balance-of-family test
are prepared to wait in a queue before your visa can be decided

Contributory Parent (Temporary) visa (subclass 173)

This visa lets parents live in Australia for up to two years if they are the parents of an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen who is settled in Australia.

What are the eligibility criteria?

According to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you may be eligible if you:

are sponsored
meet the balance-of-family test
are prepared to pay much higher visa application charges for faster processing

Take the first step in the visa application process

#CANADA: ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT #STUDY_PERMIT

CANADA ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT STUDY PERMIT

Choosing to study in Canada means – cue epic music – getting hold of a Canadian study permit (a Canadian visa, essentially). A Canadian study permit will allow you to stay in the country for the duration of your course. If your course lasts for less than six months, you’re one of the lucky few; you won’t need a visa arrangement. Those on courses which last longer than six months, however, can learn more about the process of applying for a Canadian study permit- it’s far easier than you think!

The good news

One of the best things about having a Canadian study permit, besides being able to study and live in the country, is the fact that you can work on-campus throughout your course. Given the expense of further education, this can be an extremely welcome benefit! At some institutions, you can even work off-campus thanks to your study permit; you should discuss this with your chosen university. So, whatever course of study you’re following, it may be worthwhile to apply for a permit as soon as you are accepted onto your course- it might well pay off!

Think digital

As in the case of any serious document, the application process is involving and can be quite long term. If you apply for a Canadian study permit offline, you can expect to have quite a long wait before you hear any news about it. You could also apply online, and if you do this it will take half as much time as it would if you go through the paper channels. As with most activities nowadays, online is the way to go! When you are making a serious application, the online application is generally seen as being the quickest and most efficient route towards receiving the results you need. For further information on both paper and online applications, take a look at the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website.

If you are applying online, be ready to make scans of all the important documents you need to make the application go through. It’s worthwhile gathering all your documents together beforehand, so you’re ready to get them scanned. If you don’t have a scanner at home (and not everyone does) take it to a local stationery store and do it there. If you have a smartphone, there’re plenty of scanner apps that do the job too. So it shouldn’t be too hard to get this part of your electronic application taken care of.

Before you can do any of this though, you have to have a letter of acceptance from your university. It has to be a standard and recognised letter. You need to ask your university that has given you the place for this letter; they will know what to do. Once you have got your letter, you can then formally start the process towards applying and receiving your Canadian study permit.

Get your hands on an application package

Then, go to the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website and apply for an application package. These packages are available either from the website or from your local consulate.

Either way, you’ll have to answer questions about yourself and your study options so that it can be determined whether or not you’re eligible for a Canadian study permit. Remember that this is a visa application essentially, and certain protocols apply.

Once you have satisfied all of these particular parameters and requirements, you’ll receive a code for the website and then you can make an application online. If you’re not making an application online you will still have to use the website to arrange for posting the documents or visiting the appropriate office to deliver the application.

Studying in Canada will open up a whole world of culture and excitement, and applying for the student permit should not be an issue. Get it done as soon as you get your application accepted and you should be able to arrange things quickly. Like all things concerning your student experience, planning and preparation is key. The more prepared you are, and the earlier your application, the quicker you can get on with enjoying your course- and enjoying Canada!

Australia Bridging Visa Options (A-E)

AUSTRALIA BRIDGING VISA FROM A TO E AND UNDERSTAND WHEN NEEDED AND WHO CAN APPLY WITH PURPOSE OF THE SAME

What are bridging Visas?

The complexity of the Australian immigration process means that sometimes visas might expire before a new one has been issued.

Being in the country unlawfully should never be considered an appropriate option. That person risks being detained and removed from Australia, or might not be granted another visa for up to three years.

However, situations may arise where someone’s visa has expired, but they need to stay in the country. That is why the Department of Immigration is able to issue certain people with “bridging visas” under limited circumstances.

A bridging visa allows a person to remain in Australia lawfully until they are issued with a new substantive visa or while they make arrangements to leave the country.

There are several types of bridging visas (A to E) all of which have strict requirements on what a holder can do while in the country. You cannot apply for a bridging visa if you are overseas.

A person cannot stay in the country on a bridging visa indefinitely. This visa is only a temporary short-term visa granted by the immigration department while the holder has their outstanding immigration matter resolved. It should never be considered a solution to an Australian immigration issue.

There will be certain conditions attached to a bridging visa that the person must follow.

If a person is issued with an A-type bridging visa (BVA), they will not always have the right to work in Australia, even if they had a visa that entitled them to work previously. However, work rights will automatically be granted if the person has been sponsored by an employer for a substantive visa and appears to meet the requirements for the visa, and the person previously held another type of visa that entitled them to work.

Generally, a person with a bridging visa does not have the right to travel on this visa so if someone left Australia, they would not be able to get back again. However, the B-type bridging visa (BVB) does allow the holder to travel under certain circumstances. This bridging visa is usually only valid for three months, so a person will have to be back in Australia before it expires.

A C-type bridging visa (BVC) will allow someone to remain in Australia lawfully while they are applying for a substantive visa, but where they did not already hold one.

People who have been found to be unlawful or are making arrangements to leave permanently can be granted an E-type bridging visa (BVE) so they are not stopped at customs for overstaying.

Philippines Work Permit Options

PHILIPPINES TWO TYPES OF WORK PERMIT FOR FOREIGN UNDER WHICH ONE ALLOW TO WORK FOR MAXIMUM OF SIX MONTHS AND ANOTHER FOR FIVE YEARS

Foreigners who want to work in the Philippines can apply for the following permits:

1.) Special Working Permit – A permit issued by the Commission of Immigration (CID) valid for 3 to 6 months without any extension/renewal. After the expiration of the 6 month period, the foreign worker may continue working provided that he applies and issued a Alien Employment Permit (AEP) and a working visa.

2. Alien Employment Permit (AEP) – A permit issued by the Department of Labor and Employment effective for 1 year and renewable for a maximum period of 5 years. Upon issuance of the AEP, the foreign worker is required to convert his tourist visa to a working visa (9G Visa). In the meantime, he can avail of a Provisional Permit in order to work while his application for a working visa is being processed.

Australian Dollar -AUD hits six and half year low

AUSTRALIA BEST TIME FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS TO STUDY BECAUSE AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR HIT SIX AND HALF YEAR LOW MAKING TUITION FEES STUDENT ACCOMMODATION FOOD AND TRAVEL AFFORDABLE AS FOR EXAMPLE IF CANBERRA UNIVERSITY INCREASED FEES FROM $ 30000 TO $33000 BUT CHINESE STUDENT WHO PAID LAST YEAR 172800 YUAN NEEDS TO PAY ONLY 149490 YUAN THIS YEAR DUE TO DEPRECIATION

The Australian dollar has hit a six-and-a-half year low, but the decline has produced a welcome incentive for international students electing to study in Australia.

The cost of tuition fees, student accommodation, food and travel expenses had traditionally made the decision to study abroad a considerable strain for many students, or for parents financing their offspring’s study.

But a devaluation of the Australian dollar against major currencies was a great relief for international students at educational institutions across Australia.

Asif Narejo, an international student studying at a tertiary institution in Canberra, said the change in the Australian dollar reduced significant pressure, allowing him to focus his attention on his studies.

“It does help me a lot, less mental health stress, in terms of financial problems and the worry about my parents providing me money,” he said.

“Plus it does improve my living standards as well, providing me more money here.”
Tuition fees costing less for international students

Despite rises in tertiary tuition costs in Australia, international students are experiencing fee reductions.
Example of fees paid for a Bachelor of engineering at a Canberra university*

Australian Dollar Chinese Yuan Indian Rupee
2014 30,000 173,000 1.7 mil
2015 33,000 150,000 1.55 mil

*Data may vary as fees and currency rates change

For example, the annual cost of studying a Bachelor of engineering at a Canberra university increased from about $30,000 last year to $33,000 in 2015, but the fall in the Australian dollar meant that students from China would be paying less this year.

Last year Chinese students paid 172,800 Yuan, this year that dropped to 149,490 Yuan.

Financial advisor with Morgans Canberra Matthew McNamara said international students were experiencing greater return for their investment, compared to 12 months ago.

“With the decline in the Aussie dollar around 20 per cent — especially against the Chinese Yuan — these guys are effectively getting cheaper deal in tuition fees,” he said.

“It’s not only that, it’s rent, it’s food, retail, hospitality so effectively they are getting more.”

Mr McNamara said it was unlikely the Australian dollar would deviate dramatically in the foreseeable future.

“We believe there is going to be continued pressure on the Aussie dollar in the short term and the long term,” he said.

“There are fundamental drivers which will put continued pressure on the Aussie dollar.

“We see falling commodity prices, low inflation expectations and the risk of rising unemployment.

“Combine this with deteriorating terms of trade with Australia; obviously it doesn’t paint a good picture for the Aussie dollar.”

University of Canberra Vice Chancellor Stephen Parker said it was “probably the best time to study in Australia”.

“Australia has got very strong universities, … world ranked. The reputation of having a degree from an Australian University travels very well,” he said.

“When they go back to their home country, I think it’s a good thing for them to have.”

‪‎Study‬ in ‪South Korea‬ | ‪Good‬ ‪Success‬ Ratio

‪#‎Study‬ in ‪#‎South_Korea‬ | ‪#‎Good‬ ‪#‎Success‬ ratio

Docs Required:
1. SOP ( Statement Of Purpose)
2. 2 LOR’s ( Letter Of Recommendation )
3. Filled and signed Application Form
4. IELTS – If have
5. All Academics
6. Scholarship Essay
7. Bank Balance + Balance Certificate (Parents or Husband) . Minimum 10-12 lacs (1 day old funds accepted )
8. PAN card (Parents or Husband)
9. Passport
10. last 2 year IT return of parents – Min. 3.5 lacs each year.
Conditional OL will be generated.

– Skype Interview with Univ
– If Skype Cleared, Offer & Invoice is generated
– Fees Payment
– File Lodgement
– Student might be asked to attend the Interview with Visa officer
– Visa Approval
– Fly to South Korea

* Fees: approx USD8000-$10000 including 1 year tuition fees + Accomodation + Health Insurance + Airport Pick up + Enrollment Fees

* Gap Accepted maximum 2-3 years

For more details Call Nikhil @ +91 99880 06227 for more info

Express Entry | 347 Occupation Eligible for PR | Apply today with CRS

CANADA 347 OCCUPATIONS LIST FOR IMMIGRANTS TO BECOME ELIGIBLE TO APPLY AS FEDERAL SKILLED WORKERS CATEGORY UNDER EXPRESS ENTRY SYSTEM ENABLING THEM TO BECOME PERMANENT RESIDENCY ON RECEIVING INVITATION

On January 1, 2015, the Government of Canada implemented the Express Entry Immigration system under the Economic Class including the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

Under Express Entry, Federal Skilled Workers across 347 eligible occupations who meet minimum entry criteria, submit an expression of interest profile to the Express Entry Pool. The profiles of candidates in the pool are ranked under a Comprehensive Ranking System. The highest ranked candidates will be considered for an invitation to apply for permanent residence. Candidates receiving an invitation must submit a full application within a delay of 60-days.

Federal Skilled Workers are persons with suitable education, work experience, age and language abilities under one of Canada’s official languages and who are selected under the Express Entry Immigration system to apply for permanent residence.

To qualify for admission to the Express Entry Pool as a Federal Skilled Worker, applicants must meet the following conditions:

Essential Conditions:

Possess one-year of continuous full-time paid work experience or the equivalent in part-time continuous employment within the previous 10 years in one of 347 eligible occupations listed under the applicable National Occupational Classification system; AND
The work experience must be classified within Skill Type 0 (Managerial Occupations), Skill Level A (Professional Occupations), or Skill Level B (Technical Occupations and Skilled Trades) within the meaning of the National Occupational Classification system; AND
Score sufficient points under the skilled worker point grid comprising of six selection factors. The current pass mark is 67 points;
Undergo language testing from a recognized third party and demonstrate intermediate level language skills in English or French corresponding to the Canadian Language Benchmark of 7)
Possess suitable settlement funding;
Undergo a successful security background and medical examination.

Express Entry: Eligible Federal Skilled Worker Occupations:

0011 Legislators
0012 Senior government managers and officials
0013 Senior managers – financial, communications and other business services
0014 Senior managers – health, education, social and community services and membership organizations
0015 Senior managers – trade, broadcasting and other services, n.e.c.
0016 Senior managers – construction, transportation, production and utilities
0111 Financial managers
0112 Human resources managers
0113 Purchasing managers
0114 Other administrative services managers
0121 Insurance, real estate and financial brokerage managers
0122 Banking, credit and other investment managers
0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers
0125 Other business services managers
0131 Telecommunication carriers managers
0132 Postal and courier services managers
0211 Engineering managers
0212 Architecture and science managers
0213 Computer and information systems managers
0311 Managers in health care
0411 Government managers – health and social policy development and program administration
0412 Government managers – economic analysis, policy development and program administration
0413 Government managers – education policy development and program administration
0414 Other managers in public administration
0421 Administrators – post-secondary education and vocational training
0422 School principals and administrators of elementary and secondary education
0423 Managers in social, community and correctional services
0431 Commissioned police officers
0432 Fire chiefs and senior firefighting officers
0433 Commissioned officers of the Canadian Forces
0511 Library, archive, museum and art gallery managers
0512 Managers – publishing, motion pictures, broadcasting and performing arts
0513 Recreation, sports and fitness program and service directors
0601 Corporate sales managers
0621 Retail and wholesale trade managers
0631 Restaurant and food service managers
0632 Accommodation service managers
0651 Managers in customer and personal services, n.e.c.
0711 Construction managers
0712 Home building and renovation managers
0714 Facility operation and maintenance managers
0731 Managers in transportation
0811 Managers in natural resources production and fishing
0821 Managers in agriculture
0822 Managers in horticulture
0823 Managers in aquaculture
0911 Manufacturing managers
0912 Utilities managers
1111 Financial auditors and accountants
1112 Financial and investment analysts
1113 Securities agents, investment dealers and brokers
1114 Other financial officers
1121 Human resources professionals
1122 Professional occupations in business management consulting
1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations
1211 Supervisors, general office and administrative support workers
1212 Supervisors, finance and insurance office workers
1213 Supervisors, library, correspondence and related information workers
1214 Supervisors, mail and message distribution occupations
1215 Supervisors, supply chain, tracking and scheduling co-ordination occupations
1221 Administrative officers
1222 Executive assistants
1223 Human resources and recruitment officers
1224 Property administrators
1225 Purchasing agents and officers
1226 Conference and event planners
1227 Court officers and justices of the peace
1228 Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers
1241 Administrative assistants
1242 Legal administrative assistants
1243 Medical administrative assistants
1251 Court reporters, medical transcriptionists and related occupations
1252 Health information management occupations
1253 Records management technicians
1254 Statistical officers and related research support occupations
1311 Accounting technicians and bookkeepers
1312 Insurance adjusters and claims examiners
1313 Insurance underwriters
1314 Assessors, valuators and appraisers
1315 Customs, ship and other brokers
2111 Physicists and astronomers
2112 Chemists
2113 Geoscientists and oceanographers
2114 Meteorologists and climatologists
2115 Other professional occupations in physical sciences
2121 Biologists and related scientists
2122 Forestry professionals
2123 Agricultural representatives, consultants and specialists
2131 Civil engineers
2132 Mechanical engineers
2133 Electrical and electronics engineers
2134 Chemical engineers
2141 Industrial and manufacturing engineers
2142 Metallurgical and materials engineers
2143 Mining engineers
2144 Geological engineers
2145 Petroleum engineers
2146 Aerospace engineers
2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers)
2148 Other professional engineers, n.e.c.
2151 Architects
2152 Landscape architects
2153 Urban and land use planners
2154 Land surveyors
2161 Mathematicians, statisticians and actuaries
2171 Information systems analysts and consultants
2172 Database analysts and data administrators
2173 Software engineers and designers
2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers
2175 Web designers and developers
2211 Chemical technologists and technicians
2212 Geological and mineral technologists and technicians
2221 Biological technologists and technicians
2222 Agricultural and fish products inspectors
2223 Forestry technologists and technicians
2224 Conservation and fishery officers
2225 Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
2231 Civil engineering technologists and technicians
2232 Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians
2233 Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians
2234 Construction estimators
2241 Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
2242 Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment)
2243 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics
2244 Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors
2251 Architectural technologists and technicians
2252 Industrial designers
2253 Drafting technologists and technicians
2254 Land survey technologists and technicians
2255 Technical occupations in geomatics and meteorology
2261 Non-destructive testers and inspection technicians
2262 Engineering inspectors and regulatory officers
2263 Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
2264 Construction inspectors
2271 Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
2272 Air traffic controllers and related occupations
2273 Deck officers, water transport
2274 Engineer officers, water transport
2275 Railway traffic controllers and marine traffic regulators
2281 Computer network technicians
2282 User support technicians
2283 Information systems testing technicians
3011 Nursing co-ordinators and supervisors
3012 Registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurses
3111 Specialist physicians
3112 General practitioners and family physicians
3113 Dentists
3114 Veterinarians
3121 Optometrists
3122 Chiropractors
3124 Allied primary health practitioners
3125 Other professional occupations in health diagnosing and treating
3131 Pharmacists
3132 Dietitians and nutritionists
3141 Audiologists and speech-language pathologists
3142 Physiotherapists
3143 Occupational therapists
3144 Other professional occupations in therapy and assessment
3211 Medical laboratory technologists
3212 Medical laboratory technicians and pathologists’ assistants
3213 Animal health technologists and veterinary technicians
3214 Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists and cardiopulmonary technologists
3215 Medical radiation technologists
3216 Medical sonographers
3217 Cardiology technologists and electrophysiological diagnostic technologists, n.e.c.
3219 Other medical technologists and technicians (except dental health)
3221 Denturists
3222 Dental hygienists and dental therapists
3223 Dental technologists, technicians and laboratory assistants
3231 Opticians
3232 Practitioners of natural healing
3233 Licensed practical nurses
3234 Paramedical occupations
3236 Massage therapists
3237 Other technical occupations in therapy and assessment
4011 University professors and lecturers
4012 Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
4021 College and other vocational instructors
4031 Secondary school teachers
4032 Elementary school and kindergarten teachers
4033 Educational counsellors
4111 Judges
4112 Lawyers and Quebec notaries
4151 Psychologists
4152 Social workers
4153 Family, marriage and other related counsellors
4154 Professional occupations in religion
4155 Probation and parole officers and related occupations
4156 Employment counsellors
4161 Natural and applied science policy researchers, consultants and program officers
4162 Economists and economic policy researchers and analysts
4163 Business development officers and marketing researchers and consultants
4164 Social policy researchers, consultants and program officers
4165 Health policy researchers, consultants and program officers
4166 Education policy researchers, consultants and program officers
4167 Recreation, sports and fitness policy researchers, consultants and program officers
4168 Program officers unique to government
4169 Other professional occupations in social science, n.e.c.
4211 Paralegal and related occupations
4212 Social and community service workers
4214 Early childhood educators and assistants
4215 Instructors of persons with disabilities
4216 Other instructors
4217 Other religious occupations
4311 Police officers (except commissioned)
4312 Firefighters
4313 Non-commissioned ranks of the Canadian Forces
5111 Librarians
5112 Conservators and curators
5113 Archivists
5121 Authors and writers
5122 Editors
5123 Journalists
5125 Translators, terminologists and interpreters
5131 Producers, directors, choreographers and related occupations
5132 Conductors, composers and arrangers
5133 Musicians and singers
5134 Dancers
5135 Actors and comedians
5136 Painters, sculptors and other visual artists
5211 Library and public archive technicians
5212 Technical occupations related to museums and art galleries
5221 Photographers
5222 Film and video camera operators
5223 Graphic arts technicians
5224 Broadcast technicians
5225 Audio and video recording technicians
5226 Other technical and co-ordinating occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting and the performing arts
5227 Support occupations in motion pictures, broadcasting, photography and the performing arts
5231 Announcers and other broadcasters
5232 Other performers, n.e.c.
5241 Graphic designers and illustrators
5242 Interior designers and interior decorators
5243 Theatre, fashion, exhibit and other creative designers
5244 Artisans and craftspersons
5245 Patternmakers – textile, leather and fur products
5251 Athletes
5252 Coaches
5253 Sports officials and referees
5254 Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
6211 Retail sales supervisors
6221 Technical sales specialists – wholesale trade
6222 Retail and wholesale buyers
6231 Insurance agents and brokers
6232 Real estate agents and salespersons
6235 Financial sales representatives
6311 Food service supervisors
6312 Executive housekeepers
6313 Accommodation, travel, tourism and related services supervisors
6314 Customer and information services supervisors
6315 Cleaning supervisors
6316 Other services supervisors
6321 Chefs
6322 Cooks
6331 Butchers, meat cutters and fishmongers – retail and wholesale
6332 Bakers
6341 Hairstylists and barbers
6342 Tailors, dressmakers, furriers and milliners
6343 Shoe repairers and shoemakers
6344 Jewellers, jewellery and watch repairers and related occupations
6345 Upholsterers
6346 Funeral directors and embalmers
7201 Contractors and supervisors, machining, metal forming, shaping and erecting trades and related occupations
7202 Contractors and supervisors, electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
7203 Contractors and supervisors, pipefitting trades
7204 Contractors and supervisors, carpentry trades
7205 Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
7231 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
7232 Tool and die makers
7233 Sheet metal workers
7234 Boilermakers
7235 Structural metal and platework fabricators and fitters
7236 Ironworkers
7237 Welders and related machine operators
7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system)
7242 Industrial electricians
7243 Power system electricians
7244 Electrical power line and cable workers
7245 Telecommunications line and cable workers
7246 Telecommunications installation and repair workers
7247 Cable television service and maintenance technicians
7251 Plumbers
7252 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
7253 Gas fitters
7271 Carpenters
7272 Cabinetmakers
7281 Bricklayers
7282 Concrete finishers
7283 Tile setters
7284 Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers and lathers
7291 Roofers and shinglers
7292 Glaziers
7293 Insulators
7294 Painters and decorators (except interior decorators)
7295 Floor covering installers
7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
7302 Contractors and supervisors, heavy equipment operator crews
7303 Supervisors, printing and related occupations
7304 Supervisors, railway transport operations
7305 Supervisors, motor transport and other ground transit operators
7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
7313 Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
7314 Railway Carmen/women
7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
7316 Machine fitters
7318 Elevator constructors and mechanics
7321 Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics and mechanical repairers
7322 Motor vehicle body repairers
7331 Oil and solid fuel heating mechanics
7332 Appliance servicers and repairers
7333 Electrical mechanics
7334 Motorcycle, all-terrain vehicle and other related mechanics
7335 Other small engine and small equipment repairers
7361 Railway and yard locomotive engineers
7362 Railway conductors and brakemen/women
7371 Crane operators
7372 Drillers and blasters – surface mining, quarrying and construction
7373 Water well drillers
7381 Printing press operators
7384 Other trades and related occupations, n.e.c.
8211 Supervisors, logging and forestry
8221 Supervisors, mining and quarrying
8222 Contractors and supervisors, oil and gas drilling and services
8231 Underground production and development miners
8232 Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
8241 Logging machinery operators
8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers8255 Contractors and supervisors, landscaping, grounds maintenance and horticulture services
8261 Fishing masters and officers
8262 Fishermen/women
9211 Supervisors, mineral and metal processing
9212 Supervisors, petroleum, gas and chemical processing and utilities
9213 Supervisors, food, beverage and associated products processing
9214 Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
9215 Supervisors, forest products processing
9217 Supervisors, textile, fabric, fur and leather products processing and manufacturing
9221 Supervisors, motor vehicle assembling
9222 Supervisors, electronics manufacturing
9223 Supervisors, electrical products manufacturing
9224 Supervisors, furniture and fixtures manufacturing
9226 Supervisors, other mechanical and metal products manufacturing
9227 Supervisors, other products manufacturing and assembly
9231 Central control and process operators, mineral and metal processing
9232 Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
9235 Pulping, papermaking and coating control operators
9241 Power engineers and power systems operators
9243 Water and waste treatment plant operators

 To apply Call Varun @ +91 97815 53162 for more info

Carer Visa Subclass 116 – Australia is now open

Carer visa (subclass 116)

Features

​This visa is for someone who needs to move to Australia to:

  • care for a relative in Australia with a long-term or permanent medical condition, or
  • assist a relative providing care to a member of their family unit with a long-term or permanent medical conditions.

Requirements

You might be eligible for this visa if

  • you have a relative in Australia who needs assistance due to a long-term or permanent medical condition
  • your relative has arranged an assessment with Bupa Medical Visa Services
  • there is no one else in Australia who can provide the care or assistance
  • you are willing and able to assist your relative
  • you are sponsored by your relative or their partner.​

A Carer visa (subclass 116) is a permanent visa for people who want to live in Australia to provide substantial and continuing care or assistance for a relative who either:

  • has a long-term medical condition that means they cannot look after themselves in practical aspects of daily life, or
  • needs permanent or long-term practical support to help them care for a member of their family in their household with such a medical condition.

The relative must not be able to reasonably obtain the care they need from any other relative or from welfare, hospital, nursing or community services in Australia.

The Carer visa (subclass 116) is a permanent visa. You must make your application outside Australia. You, and all family members included as applicants, must be outside Australia when it is granted.

This is a permanent visa. It lets you and any family members who have been granted this visa:

  • stay in Australia indefinitely as an Australian permanent resident
  • apply for Australian citizenship (if you are eligible)
  • travel to and from Australia as a permanent resident for five years from the date the visa is granted – after that time you will need to apply for another visa if you want to return to Australia.

The Australian Government limits the number of Carer visas it grants each year. See Other Family Visa Queue for more information.

 

Your sponsor

To apply for this visa, you need a sponsor. This person must be the relative who needs the care or assistance, or their partner. They must sign an undertaking (an agreement) to give you support, accommodation and financial assistance (if you need it) for two years after you first arrive in Australia. This agreement includes any family members you include in your application.

Your passport

If you plan to get a new passport, you should do so before applying for your visa. In most cases, you and your family members must have valid passports to be granted this visa.

You might be eligible for this visa if:

  • you need to move to Australia to:
    • care for a relative in Australia with a long-term medical condition, or
    • assist a relative in providing this care to a member of their family unit living in their household.
  • your relative (or their family member) has their medical condition assessed by Bupa Medical Visa Services as being a one which significantly affects them in attending to the practical aspects of daily life and which will need direct care for at least two years
  • your relative cannot reasonably get the care they need from any other relative in Australia or from welfare, hospital or nursing community services in Australia
  • you are willing and able to provide substantial and continuing assistance
  • you should fully understand what kind of care or assistance your relative needs
  • you and your family members meet health and character requirements.

Your relative in Australia

You can apply for this visa if the relative who needs care or assistance is usually resident in Australia. The relative must be your partner, child, parent, brother, sister, grandparent, grandchild, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew (or step-equivalent).

Both this relative (and the member of their family who needs care, where applicable) must be either:

If you are applying for this visa so you can assist your relative care for a member of their family, they must both live in the same house.

The sponsor

Your sponsor can be either:

  • the relative who needs care or assistance (either for themselves or a member of the family unit)
  • the spouse or de facto partner of the relative who lives with them.

The sponsor must be aged 18 years or older and be:

The medical condition

The medical condition must meet the following criteria:

  • The medical condition is long-term or permanent, and as a result your relative (or their family member) needs assistance with the practical aspects of daily life.
  • The need for care or assistance will continue for at least two years.
  • The medical condition has been assessed by Bupa Medical Visa Services. See Medical assessment of the person needing care for more information.

Contact Carelink on 1800 052 222 for more information about getting care or assistance in Australia.

Provide biometrics

You might be asked to provide biometrics (a scientific form of identification) as part of the application. More information is available at Countries and visa subclasses included in the biometrics program.

Health requirements

You must meet certain health requirements. The results are usually valid for 12 months. Do not arrange a health examination until we ask you to.

This also applies to all dependent family members included in your application, whether they are migrating or not.

Character requirements

You must meet certain character requirements. You must be prepared to provide a police certificate from each country you have lived in for 12 months or more during the past 10 years after you turned 16 years of age. Do not arrange for police certificates until we ask you to.

This also applies to all dependent family members listed in the application who are 16 years of age or older whether they are migrating or not.

Debts to the Australian Government

You must have no outstanding debts to the Australian Government or have arranged to repay any outstanding debts to the Australian Government before this visa can be granted.

 

What do Canada visa officers ask in a Marriage visa interview – Canada?

The Canadian government allows citizens and permanent residents of Canada to sponsor members of the family class. Members of the family class include a sponsor’s spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner; a dependent child of the sponsor; the sponsor’s mother or father; a person the sponsor intends to adopt; and other relatives of the sponsor as defined by regulation. In this article we will restrict our analysis to overseas sponsorship of spouse/common law/conjugal partners only.

Both husband and wife may spend several thousands of dollars in their pre marriage meetings, travel, gifts and actual ceremonies but routinely ignore the information that goes onto the forms and the actual visa office interview which will decide the fate of the principal applicant. The main person who is being sponsored and will be interviewed is called Principal applicant (PA) and that’s the term I use in this article.

Every year on an average over 10,000 spouse/common law/conjugal partners are declined permanent resident visa applications. In total approximately 15% of all ‘spousal’ applications filed worldwide get declined in the first interview assessment.

I feel sympathy for dejected sponsors who come to my office when their overseas spouse are handed a refusal letter. Now they must consider appeal which is expensive and currently does take a long time. Sometimes 3-4 years for a hearing date. There is no guarantee that the judge will reverse the decision of the visa officer either.  Only if they had prepared for the initial interview !

What’s Love got to do with marriage ?

Whether or not there is love in the marriage,  a visa officer is there to find out if the marriage sponsorship was done for immigration privilege. What does the Canadian immigration law say ? If you have seen the final refusal letter it will always contain the following paragraph. Read it carefully. You do not want to see this in the letter your principal applicant receives.

Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations

  1. (1) For the purposes of these Regulations, a foreign national shall not be considered a spouse, a common-law partner or a conjugal partner of a person if the marriage, common-law partnership or conjugal partnership

(a) was entered into primarily for the purpose of acquiring any status or privilege under the Act; or

(b) is not genuine.

………. Based upon the information available to me…………. I am not satisfied that your marriage to the sponsor is genuine or that it was not entered into primarily for the purpose of acquiring permanent residence in Canada…..

Ouch!

Visa officers will check if the PA entered into marriage with Canadian sponsor just to get immigration benefit by asking a series of cross check/referral questions. Each case is different and so will be the level of scrutiny.

The marriage can be for mutual benefit and convenience but not for immigration benefit. In other word as long as the applicant doesn’t desire immigration as a consequence of marrying a Canadian resident, his or her marriage is admissible for admission into Canada.

In order to convince and obtain approval, the burden of proof is on the PA to show that, on a balance of probabilities, her/his marriage is genuine and was not entered into primarily for the purpose of acquiring a status or privilege under the Act

In my immigration law practice I advise all, specially fresh, applicants for a mandatory interview rehearsal. This interview training is all that I care for in representing a client. Going to this life changing visa interview without adequate practice is like going to the war without going to the boot camp. You will be crushed.

Visa interview questions

So what do visa officers likely ask in the marriage visa interviews ?  They want to check and verify from the PA, his/her

  1. Previous immigration history.
  2. Dates and circumstances of all meetings, marriage ceremonies and later events related to cohabitation.
  3. Level of knowledge the PA has about the wife and in laws.
  4. Previous marital history of the PA and the sponsor.
  5. Discrepancy between what has been written on forms and what is being said in the interview.
  6. Circumstances of development of marriage.
  7. Contact with the sponsor and proof of communication both before and after marriage.
  8. Proof of joint activity by both as a married couple.
  9. Delay in filing of application post marriage.
  10. Presence of any deviation from current societal norms like difference in religion, age, economic status etc.

How many guests are coming to the wedding ?

Some applicants have ignorantly vouched that the numbers of guests for example or thousands of photos etc is enough to “impress” the visa officer.

Nothing could be further from the truth. The spousal relationship, as viewed by the Immigration is based upon evidence as they see from your testimony and not mere self declaration. I laughed when one applicant told me that he has a marriage certificate and why will the visa officer not consider his marriage genuine ?

To establish the strength of relationship Immigration/visa officer relies on a multitude of factors, the nature and weight of which differ depending on the case. These factors include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. the beginning, development, and duration of the couple’s relationship;
  2. the time that the couple spent together before and after the wedding;
  3. the nature of the engagement and the ceremonies;
  4. the knowledge and involvement of both respective families in the development of the relationship;
  5. plans for the future;
  6. the absence of significant contradictions in the testimonies and documentary evidence;
  7. the compatibility of the two spouses, especially in terms of age, culture, education and background;
  8. the absence of economic or financial reasons or the search for a better life that may have been the primary motive for the two parties to marry;
  9. the spouse’s level of knowledge of their day-to-day lives;
  10. the consummation of the marriage and establishment of intimate relations.

Refusal can be based upon

  1. the lack of conclusive facts and satisfactory evidence of the existence of an established marital relationship;
  2. the hasty nature of the proposal, acceptance, and signing of the marriage certificate;
  3. the differences in age, religion, and culture;
  4. the applicant’s scant knowledge of the appellant, particularly regarding her prior divorces, her children, her job, her friends, and her family;
  5. the applicant’s scant interest in the appellant’s past and certain subjects concerning her;
  6. the applicant’s only plans for his future with the appellant are economic in nature (business) and intended to improve his situation.

 

Visa officers will invariably look to see

Evidence about nature of household for marital relationship

Joint

  1. Bank accounts, credit cards or other financial accounts.
  2. Ownership of the residential property.
  3. Residential lease
  4. Rental receipts.
  5. Utilities account.
  6. Management of household expenditures.
  7. Evidence of joint purchase especially of household items.
  8. Correspondences addressed to either or both the parties t the same address.
  9. Important documents of both the parties show the same address like ID docs, driver licenses, insurance policies ec.
  10. Shared responsibilities for household management, chores etc
  11. Evidence of children of one or both partners residing with the couple.
  12. Telephone calls.

 

Same-Sex Spousal Sponsorship-Conjugal relationship

In Canada one can sponsor one’s same-sex partner to become a permanent resident.  Of course, in many parts of the world it is not possible to marry a same-sex partner, or even for partners to live together openly, and so marriage or common-law union cannot be the foundation for such a sponsorship.  Instead, the sponsorship often proceeds upon the basis that the parties are conjugal partners. Before immigration status can be conferred in such a case, however, it must be established that the relationship of the sponsor and the applicant meets the definition of conjugal partnership, and that’s where Alain Morel and Rui Guo come in.

When their case was before the Federal Court of Canada, Mr. Morel was a 59-year-old Canadian man and Mr. Guo a 27-year-old citizen of the People’s Republic of China, and they had been in a relationship for about six years.  However when their same-sex, conjugal-partner sponsorship application was filed,  the two men had known each other for only about two years, and they had only been  physically together during one visit of ten days duration.  Still, they had been in daily communication with each other by phone or other means, their relationship was exclusive, and Mr. Morel had sent Mr. Guo money and made him the beneficiary of his will.   During the next four years the relationship continued and deepened, but it is important to note that the question before the visa officer, then before the Immigration and Refugee Board that heard the appeal of the visa officer’s decision, and then before the Federal Court judge that judicially reviewed the Board’s decision, was whether the relationship met the conjugal-partner standard at the time the sponsorship application was filed.

According to the Supreme Court of Canada, as it expressed itself in the case of M. v. H. [1999] 2 SCR 3, the generally accepted characteristics of a conjugal relationshipare:

  • SHARED SHELTER: whether the partners live together in the same home as a couple;
  • SEXUAL AND PERSONAL BEHAVIOUR: whether the partners’ relationship is exclusive, committed, and evidenced by emotional, intellectual, and physical interaction;
  • SERVICES: whether household and other family-type responsibilities are shared, and whether there is evidence of mutual assistance, especially in time of need;
  • SOCIAL ACTIVITIES: whether the partners share time together or participate in leisure activities together, and whether they have relationships or interaction with each other’s respective families;
  • ECONOMIC SUPPORT: whether the partners are financially interdependent or dependent, and whether they have, to some extent, joined their financial affairs or arranged them to reflect their ongoing relationship;
  • CHILDREN: the partner’s attitude and conduct towards children; and
  • SOCIETAL PERCEPTION OF THE COUPLE: whether the partners are treated or perceived by the community as a couple.

The Visa Officer refused the application because: (1) she was not satisfied that a conjugal relationship existed between the two men because their relationship was not marriage-like; and (2) their relationship was entered into primarily for the purpose of acquiring status or privilege under immigration law.  The spousal sponsorship  application therefore failed, the sponsorship was refused, the application fee was lost, and Mr. Guo remained in China.

Upon the appeal of Mr. Morel, the Immigration Appeal Division of the Immigration and Refugee Board reversed that decision, however, because the panel concluded that Mr. Morel and Mr. Guo had the characteristics of conjugal partners, because they were in daily contact, gave spontaneous and direct testimony, filed extensive supporting documentation, and established that their relationship was exclusive and somewhat financially interdependent.  The implication of such a reversal is usually that the sponsorship refusal is set aside, there is a finding registered that the relationship meets the definition of conjugal partnership, and then the application is returned to the visa post overseas for final processing.  At this point, it looked like Mr. Morel and Mr. Guo might be together in Canada a few months hence.

However, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration was not content with the Board’s decision and asked the Federal Court of Canada to review it.  Mr. Justice Lemieux did so, determining:

  • email and telephone exchanges, a money transfer and a ten-day period of cohabitation were not enough to establish a conjugal relationship;
  • it was wrong to conclude that Mr. Morel and Mr. Guo shared a life together through a computer;
  • it was not the intention of Mr. Morel alone that was important, but rather the intention of both men; and
  • the panel had neglected to consider some of the observations of the Visa Officer.

The court allowed the application for judicial review, set aside the decision of the Immigration and Refugee Board, and sent it back to the Board to be redetermined by a different panel.  The long journey of Mr. Morel and Mr. Guo, who had hoped to be living together in Canada years before, was to continue.

What lesson can we learn from this case?  Hindsight, as they say, is very clear.  In re

trospect, Mr. Morel and Mr. Guo might have waited to develop more evidence that their relationship was marriage-like before filing the sponsorship application or, in the alternative, invested more heavily in establishing a physical connection.  This might have happened had Mr. Morel traveled to China more than once before the application was filed, or had Mr. Guo come to Canada as a visitor, or at least tried to do so.  To avoid the sorts of complications they experienced, it is always desirable to carefully assess the prospects for success before filing,

  1. to fully document the relationship sought to be established,
  2. to file comprehensive written submissions, and
  3. to thoroughly prepare for the visa office interview.

If you do the work up front, you may avoid a lot of additional work and expense later.

To read the full case, the citation for which is Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration) v. Morel 2012 FC 1404, click here.

Express Entry – Canada

Express Entry – ‪#‎Canada‬ ‪#‎DirectPR‬ ‪#‎CRS‬ ‪#‎ExpressEntry‬ ‪#‎Immigration‬‪#‎PermanentResidency‬

Canada migration is now easier and quicker with Express Entry Programme being launched.

Benefits:
1. Enjoy all the benefits equal to a citizen.
2. Work anywhere and in any sector interested.
3. Free Medicals Etc.
4.Access to US after you become a Canadian citizen.
5.Canadian citizenship is a passport to visit any place in the world.

Eligibility
• No occupation list. Everyone can apply as long as they meet the pass points
• Applications will be in a pool for 12 months and highest scoring applicants will selected from that pool.
• Every 2 weeks CIC will select applicants from pool based on points.
• Couple will get more points due to spouse ability.
• Those selected will be invited to apply for Immigration and their case will be processed in 6 months
• Allocation for Federal Skilled Workers for fiscal year 2015-16 is expected to be 51000.

Please call Varun @ +91 97815 53162

Australia Permanent Visa Available Options | Skilled, Business, Family Visas

Visa Types
REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE IN AUSTRALIA

Australia’s Immigration program can be divided into 3 broad groups being Skilled or Economic migration, Family migration and the Refugee or Humanitarian program. This document will cover the first two groups.

Skilled / Economic Migration

1. General Skilled Migration

The General Skilled Migration Programme, often referred to as the points test, includes the Skilled Independent Category and Skilled Sponsored Categories.  There have been numerous changes made to the processing of these applications since January 2010 in particular with the most significant change being introduced on 1 July 2012.  From this date the General Skilled Migration Program will operate under the new SkillSelect arrangements.  This means that applicants will first need to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) and then only if they are invited to lodge an application will it be possible to formally lodge an application for Permanent Residence in Australia.  It is important to note that prior to submitting an EOI, applicants must still obtain a positive skills assessment and where required, an IELTS (International English Language Test) or OET English Test with the required score.  Effective 1 July 2012 the points test includes the following components:-

1 July 2012 Points Test – Points Allocation

Factor Description Points
  18-24 (inclusive) 25 points
  25-32 (inclusive) 30 points
Age, at time of invitation 33-39 (inclusive) 25 points
  40-44 (inclusive) 15 points
  45-49 (inclusive) 0 points
     
English Language competency Competent English – IELTS 6 / OET B 0 points
level, at time of invitation Proficient English – IELTS 7 / OET B 10 points
  Superior English – IELTS 8 / OET A 20 points
     
Overseas skilled employment in At least 3 but less than 5 years (of past 10) 5 points
nominated skilled occupation or At least 5 but less than 8 years (of past 10) 10 points
a closely related skilled occupation, At least 8 and up to 10 (of past 10) 15 points
at time of invitation    
     
Australian skilled employment At least 1 but less than 3 years (of past 10) 5 points
in nominated skilled occupation At least 3 but less than 5 years (of past 10) 10 points
or a closely related skilled occupation At least 5 but less than 8 years (of past 10) 15 points
at time of invitation At least 8 and up to 10 years (of past 10) 20 points
Note: max points for any combination of overseas and Australian skilled employment is 20 points    
     
  Doctorate from an Australian educational institution or other Doctorate of a recognized standard  

20 points

 

Educational qualifications, at time of invitation

At least a Bachelor degree, including a Bachelor degree with Honours or Masters, from an Australian educational institution or other degree of a recognized standard  

15 points

  Diploma completed in Australia, trade qualification completed in Australia, or qualification or award of recognized standard  

10 points

     
 

Australian study qualifications, at time

of invitation

One or more degrees, diplomas or trade qualifications awarded by an Australian educational institution and meet the Australian Study Requirement  

5 points

     
  Credentialled community language qualifications 5 points
 

Other factors, at time of invitation

Study in regional Australia or in a low population growth metropolitan area (excluding distance education)  

5 points

  Partner skill qualifications 5 points
  Professional Year completion, for a period of at least 12 months in the 4 year period immediately before the day on which the invitation was issued  

5 points

     
  Nomination by State or Territory government (visa subclass 190 only) 5 points
 

Nomination/Sponsorship, at time invitation

Nomination by State or Territory government or sponsorship by an eligible family member, for residing and working in a specified/designated area (visa subclass 489 only)  

 

10 points

 

1 July 2012 Points Test – Points Allocation

 

The passmark is 60 points for both the Skilled Independent (Subclass 189) and Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) categories.

To be sponsored under the Skilled Nominated category the applicant must have an occupation included on the occupation in demand list produced by the relevant State Government.  Applicants must be under age 50 at the time of application.

 

It is important to note that although sponsorship by close relatives in Australia is still possible, this is now only available to applicants with eligible relatives who reside in a designated area.  This particular visa (subclass 489) is a 4 year provisional visa and the visa holders must live and work in the specified regional area.  In certain circumstances subclas 489 visa holders may be eligible to apply for Permanent Residence under the Skilled Resgional Visa category subclass 887 after arrival in Australia.

To submit an application under these categories, applicants must have lodged an Expressiona of Interest (EOI) and have received an invitation to submit a visa application.  In addition the applicant’s occupation must be included on the Skilled Occupation List and have been assessed by the appropriate assessment authority in Australia as suitable and equivalent to the Australian occupation. It should also be noted that applicants will be required to undertake the International English Language Test as evidence of English language ability, unless the applicant holds a passport from the following countries and does not claim any points for English Language:

  • United Kingdom (UK)
  • Canada
  • New Zealand
  • United States of America (USA)
  • Republic of Ireland

2. Employer Nomination Scheme

This category is available to applicants who are sponsored by an Australian employer who can demonstrate a need for the sponsored employee. By definition applicants must be highly skilled and their occupation included on a list of gazetted occupations specifically for this category. In most cases applicants must be under age 50 but in exceptional circumstances applicants may be aged to 55.

To be eligible applicants should either have obtained a positive skills assessment in their nominated occupation and have 3 years relevant experience or be sponsored in a position, for which the taxable salary will be over A$250,000 per annum excluding Superannuation.

Alternatively, for applicants already in Australia on 457 Temporary Long-Stay Business Visas, they can apply after being on a subclass 457 visa for 2 years, including at least 1 year with the sponsoring employee.

3. Business Skills

Similar to the General Skilled Migration program discussed above, the Business Skills visa categories will also be operated under the SkillSelect system from 1 July 2012.  As such prospective business migrants will need to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI)  and then only, if formally invited to lodge a visa application, will it be possible to proceed with an application for residence in Australia.  Applicants will still be required to meet the following specified criteria:

Business Innovation Stream:

Business background Overall successful business career
Net assets – business AUD$ 200,000
Net assets- Business and personal AUD$ 800,000 lawfully acquired and capable of being transferred to Australia within 2 years
Annual turnover – business For at least 2 out of last 4 fiscal years applicant’s main business/es overseas have annual turnover of at least AUD$500,00
Net assets – settlement Applicant and/or spouse have sufficient net assets in Australia
Shareholding
  1. 51% of the business where the turnover is less than A$400,000 per annum; or
  2. 30% of the business where the turnover is A$400,000 or more per annum; or

10% where the business is a publicly listed company.

Role in overseas business For at least 2 out of 4 fiscal years applicant has spent at least 50% of time in management role in business that provides professional, technical or trade services.
Sate/Territory Government Has notified appropriate regional authority in state/territory regarding applicant and business intentions in Australia
Genuine business commitment To establish or participate in active management of qualifying business in Australia and maintain substantial ownership interest
Nil unacceptable business activity Neither applicant or spouse has history of unacceptable business activities
Need to be in Australia Demonstrates need to be in Australia to conduct or establish business activity in Australia
Age 44 years of age or less
English Vocational English
Signed declaration Understand obligations as the holder of subclass 160
Other Where applicant must be at time of decision

 

Outside Australia (primary)

In Australia if holder of student visa (secondary)

  Visa validity

 

4 years from entry expiry date
  Conditions Either 8502 or 8515 may be imposed

 

Investor Stream:

Business Background Overall successful qualifying business activity of eligible investment activity
Net assets – Business & Personal AUD$2,250,000 lawfully acquired and capable of being transferred to Australian within 2 years
Net assets – Settlement Applicant and/or spouse have sufficient net assets to settle in Australia
Ownership or net assets in business For at least 1 of 5 fiscal years applicant has direct management in qualifying business where applicant and/or spouse have:

  • 10% ownership; or
  • Net value of at least AUD$1,500,000
Role in overseas business/investment activity At least 3 years applicant has directly managed 1 or more qualifying business or eligible investments; and

High level of management skill in investment/business activity

State/Territory Government Has notified appropriate regional authority in state/territory regarding applicant and business intentions in Australia
Genuine business commitment To maintain business/investment activity
Nil unacceptable business activity Neither applicant or spouse has history of unacceptable business activities
Age 44 years of age or less
English Vocational English
Signed declaration Understand obligations as the holder of subclass 162 visa
Other: Where applicant must be at the time of decision Outside Australia (primary)

In Australia if holder of student visa (secondary)

  Visa Validity 4 years from entry expiry date
  Conditions Either 8502 or 8515 may be imposed

 

In addition applicants for the provisional Business Innovation and Investment Visa (subclass 188) are also required in all cases to have State Sponsorship and to score 65 points on the following points test:

1 July 2012 Innovation Points Test – Points Allocation

Factor Description Points
Age 18-24

25-32

33-39

40-44

45-54

20

30

25

20

15

English Language Vocational of higher

Proficient or higher

5

10

 

Qualifications

Australian trade certificate, Diploma or Bachelor degree or a Bachelor degree recognized by the Minister

 

Bachelor Degree in Business, Science or Technology

 

5

 

 

10

Business Experience Greater than 4 years business experience

 

Greater than 7 years business experience

10

 

15

Investment experience Greater than 4 years investment experience

 

Greater than 7 years investment experience

10

 

15

Financial metrics

 

Net Business and Personal Assets:

AUD800,000

AUD1.3 million

AUD1.8 million

AUD2.25 million

 

5

15

25

35

  Business turnover:

AUD500,000

AUD1 million

AUD1.5 million

AUD2 million

 

5

15

25

35

Innovation Registered patents or registered designs

Evidence of trademarks

Evidence of joint venture agreements

Evidence of export trade

Gazelle business

Evidence of receipt of grants or venture capital funding

15

10

5

15

10

 

10

State or Territory nomination Special endorsement (limited places) 10

 

While the Busines Innovation and Investment Visa is a provisional visa initially and only becomes permanent when applicants have met certain criteria in Australia, there is one Business Visa known as the Business Talent Visa which grants Permanent Residence from the outset.  The criteria to be met are much higher the the Business Innovation and Investment Visa ans can be summarised as follows:

Applicants must:

  • be a high calibre business owner who will enter into business in Australia
  • be less than 55 years of age of the nominating jurisdiction must provide their support to waive the age requirement
  • have net business and personal assets of A$1,5 million of which A$400,000 must be net business assets
  • have a business turnover of A$3 million per annum

 

Family Migration

The more common categories in this group include:
1. Parent Migration

This category is available to parents who have the majority of their children permanently resident in Australia as Australian Citizens or Australian Permanent Residents, and satisfy health and character requirements. Applicants may apply under either the contributory parent visa category which requires a significant payment to be made and by doing so expedites the processing of the application or the normal parent category which currently takes many years to be processed.

2. Spouse, De Facto Spouse or Interdependent category

Under this category applicants must be sponsored by an Australian permanent resident or citizen who is their spouse, de facto spouse or interdependent partner. To qualify as a de facto spouse applicants must have been living together with the sponsoring spouse in a mutually exclusive relationship for a minimum of 12 months.

3. Remaining Relative

Applicants under this category must be the last member of their immediate family who is not an Australian permanent resident or citizen and not living in Australia. If the applicant is married their spouse must also meet the requirements.  Currently there is a long delay in the processing of this visa category.

Apart from the criteria associated with each of the above categories applicants in all cases must meet medical requirements as well as police clearances.

 

Temporary Residents

Australia has a number of visa classes which result in temporary residence for applicants for a specified period of time. The most common visa under this category is the Long Stay Temporary Business Visa (subclass 457). This is the temporary resident alternative to the Employer Nomination Scheme described above. Further information can be provided on request.

Eligibility Requirements for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP)

Eligibility Requirements for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP)

The following are NOT eligible to submit an application to the MPNP:

  • Refugee claimants, or individuals involved in a federal appeal or removal process;
  • Live-in Caregivers currently living in Canada;
  • Temporary Foreign Workers currently working and residing in a province other than Manitoba;
  • Spouses of Canadian Citizens or permanent residents;
  • Individuals who have been refused by the MPNP within the last 6 months and who are not able to address the reason(s) for refusal; and
  • Individuals who have an active immigration application with any other provincial immigration program in Canada.

 

Below are the detailed eligibility requirements for the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP):

 

Skilled Workers in Manitoba

Ongoing Manitoba employment means that a Manitoba company has offered you a long-term, full-time job after you have completed at least six months (continuous) full-time employment with that company as a temporary foreign worker or international student working graduate.

Unlike the other connections to Manitoba in the MPNP, Skilled Workers in Manitoba are not subject to a points-based assessment.

Qualifying Employment

Your employer must be incorporated or registered by or under an act of the legislature of a province or the Parliament of Canada and operating as a business that has an established production capability, plant or place of business in Manitoba.

Your employer must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the MPNP that they are an established business with an ability to offer you full-time and long-term employment in Manitoba.

Any periods of self-employment, unauthorized work, or periods of employment during which you were engaged in full-time study (e.g. work experience gained on a co-op permit) will not be included when calculating the period of qualifying work experience in Manitoba.

Self-employed individuals, business owners, owner-operators and individuals providing services as independent contractors to the business supporting their application are NOT eligible to apply as Skilled Workers in Manitoba and any work experience in Manitoba gained in those capacities will not be considered when calculating the qualifying period of work in the province.

Note: The MPNP will only issue a work permit support letter to you if there is a demonstrated employee-employer relationship.

Requirements for International Students from other provinces

If you have graduated from a post-secondary program in another Canadian province and want to apply to the MPNP for Skilled Workers under this category because you’ve been offered a job in Manitoba, note that to be eligible you must first have been working for that Manitoba employer for at least one year.

 

Temporary Foreign Workers

Required documents: In MPNP Online, you must upload copies of your valid work permit and, from your Manitoba employer, written confirmation that you’ve been working full-time for at least six months continuous, as well as your job-offer letter, specifying salary/wage and details of the position, signed and on company letterhead, along with all other documents described on the page Documents.

Conditions:

  • The offer of long-term employment must be from the same employer for whom you have been working full-time for the required time period.
  • You must have all qualifications for the position including training/education and any required licence or certification.
  • You must have job-ready English; specifically you must demonstrate the English or French proficiency to fulfill the duties of your job description.
  • Your connection to Manitoba through employment must be stronger than ties you may have to another province.
  • You must demonstrate in a Settlement Plan your intention and plan to live, work and establish your work and family life in Manitoba as a permanent resident.
Please note:
  • People exempt from requiring a work permit to work in Manitoba (e.g. Ministers of Religion) are not eligible to apply to the MPNP under this category.
  • Employment that is part of a work-study program is ineligible.
  • Skilled workers applying on the basis of ongoing employment in Manitoba must still provide documented proof of settlement funds in their name. However, the MPNP will consider your current income, so you may not necessarily require the generally recommended C$10,000 in settlement funds.

International Student Working Graduates

Only graduates of Manitoba post-secondary educational institutions are considered. You are eligible if your Manitoba employer offers you a long-term job following at least six months of continuous full-time employment on a valid post-graduation work permit.

Required documents: In MPNP Online you must upload copies of: your valid post-graduation work permit; confirmation from your employer of minimum six months continuous full-time work; your job-offer letter, specifying salary/wage and details of the position, on company letterhead and signed by your employer, as well as education and all other documents described on the page: Documents.

Conditions:

  • You attended an authorized education or training program at a public, or registered private vocational, post-secondary institution in Manitoba. (Language programs are specifically excluded.)
  • Your academic/vocational program was full-time and at least one academic year in duration.
  • You successfully completed your program and were awarded a diploma, degree or certificate.
  • You have been continuously working at least six months for the same employer who has offered you a permanent (long-term) full-time job.
  • You have a valid post-graduation work permit from Citizenship and Immigration Canada.
  • Your connection to Manitoba through employment is stronger than ties you may have to another Canadian province.
  • You demonstrate in a Settlement Plan your intention and plan to live, work and establish your work and family life in Manitoba as a permanent resident.
  • You have all qualifications and the English or French language proficiency to fulfill the duties of your job. Minimum language for lower-skilled occupations If your job is classified as lower skilled (NOC C or D) you must submit in MPNP Online results of an MPNP-approved language test demonstrating official language proficiency at CLB 4 (NCLC 4, French) or higher in all test categories according to the MPNP’s CLB Language Grid. NOC C and D jobs include lower-skilled workers in the trades, primary and manufacturing industries, sales and services, and certain clerical and assistant categories.

Manitoba Skilled Worker Overseas

Candidates must score at least 60 out of 100 points on the points assessment grid.
Factor 1: Language Proficiency Points
First language (English or French)
CLB 8 or higher / native speaker 20
CLB 7 18
CLB 6 16
CLB 5 14
CLB 4 12
CLB 3 or lower 0
Second language (English or French)
CLB 5 or higher 5
Factor 2: Age
18 4
19 6
20 8
21 to 45 10
46 8
47 6
48 4
49 2
50 or older 0
Factor 3: Work Experience (in the past five years)
Less than one year 0
One year 8
Two years 10
Three years 12
Four years or more 15
Factor 4: Education
Master’s or Doctorate 25
Two post-secondary programs of at least two years each 23
One post-secondary program of two years or longer 20
One one year post-secondary program 14
Trade certification 14
No post-secondary education 0
Factor 5: Adaptability
Close relative in Manitoba 20
Invitation to Apply received from MPNP as part of recruitment mission or exploratory visit 20
Previous work experience in Manitoba (at least six months) 12
Completed post-secondary program of two years or more in Manitoba 12
Completed post-secondary program of at least one year in Manitoba 10
Friend or distant relative living in Manitoba 10
Bonus: Intention to reside outside Winnipeg 5
Total 100

 

By completing an Expression of Interest, eligible candidates automatically receive a score based on a number of criteria. The highest-scoring candidates in the pool will be invited on a regular basis to provide a full application to the MPNP.

A points-based system is used to assess and score candidates’ profiles, and rank them in the Expressions of Interest pool.

Factor 1: Language Proficiency Points
First language (English or French) Up to 125
CLB 8 or higher / native speaker 25 per band
CLB 7 22 per band
CLB 6 20 per band
CLB 5 17 per band
CLB 4 12 per band
CLB 3 or lower 0
Second language (English or French)
CLB 5 or higher 25 overall
Factor 2: Age Up to 75
18 20
19 30
20 40
21 to 45 75
46 40
47 30
48 20
49 10
50 or older 0
Factor 3: Work Experience (in the past five years) Up to 175
Less than one year 0
One year 40
Two years 50
Three years 60
Four years or more 75
Bonus: Fully recognized by provincial licensing body 100
Factor 4: Education Up to 125
Master’s or Doctorate 125
Two post-secondary programs of at least two years each 115
One post-secondary program of three years or more 110
One post-secondary program of two years or longer 100
One one year post-secondary program 70
Trade certification 70
No post-secondary education 0
Factor 5: Adaptability Up to 500
Close relative in Manitoba 200
Previous work experience in Manitoba (6 months or more) 100
Completed post-secondary program in Manitoba (2 years or more) 100
Completed post-secondary program in Manitoba (one year) 50
Close friend or distant relative in Manitoba 50
Ongoing employment in Manitoba for 6 months or more with long-term job offer from the same employer 500
Invitation to Apply under a Strategic Initiative 500
Immigration destination in Manitoba is outside Winnipeg 50
Factor 6: Risk Assessment Up to minus 100
Close relative in another province and no close relative in Manitoba Minus 100
Work experience in another Canadian province Minus 100
Studies in another province Minus 100
Previous immigration application to another province Minus 100

 

Manitoba Invitation Stream

This stream is only open to applicants who have received a Letter of Invitation from the MPNP inviting them to apply to this program. The MPNP regularly travels overseas on recruitment missions to identify possible candidates for this stream.

  • Applicants must meet the following criteria in order to participate in an exploratory visit to Manitoba:
  • Be between 21 and 45 years of age
  • Demonstrate that they do not have a stronger connection to a province other than Manitoba
  • Demonstrate employability and adaptability
  • Hold at least a one-year, post-secondary certificate or training diploma, degree or certificate
  • Have at least two years of full-time work experience in the past five years
  • Demonstrate the ability to find a job in Manitoba in intended occupation (including plans to achieve licensing/certification, if necessary)
  • Provide a Settlement Plan that demonstrates a genuine intention and ability to become established in Manitoba
  • Provide General Training IELTS test scores from within the past two years, scoring at least 5 in each category

Applicants who have been invited to apply for immigration through this stream must first travel to Manitoba to conduct an exploratory visit. During this visit, they are expected to research communities and employment opportunities across the province, so they can decide on the best course of action for themselves and their families should they be selected to move to Manitoba.

 

Manitoba Support Stream

Note: 2014 Application Intake is closed for all skilled workers except those whose assessed connection is Manitoba Employment or Manitoba Invitation.

This stream was created for skilled workers who are not currently employed in the province but possess a personal connection to Manitoba. Principal applicants must score at least 60 out of 100 points on the MPNP selection grid. This grid takes into account the following factors:

  • Language proficiency
  • Age
  • Work Experience
  • Education
  • Adaptability

The personal connection, known as the Manitoba Supporter, will provide support during the application process.

The Manitoba Supporter must have one of the following relationships with the applicant:

  • Close relative
    • Sister or brother
    • Niece or nephew
    • Aunt or uncle
    • First cousin
    • Mother or father
    • Grandmother or grandfather
  • Distant Relative
  • Close Friend

In addition, the Manitoba Supporter must meet the following criteria:

  • Provide documentation showing they currently reside and are established in Manitoba, and have been living in the province for at least one year
  • Be a Canadian citizen or Permanent Resident
  • Demonstrate close ties to the applicant (was redundant)
  • Demonstrate that any previously supported applicants have successfully established themselves in Manitoba
  • Be able to support the applicant’s Settlement Plan

If the supporter is a friend or distant relative, they can only support one applicant at a time through this stream. A close relative can support more than one applicant at a time, provided they demonstrate that they are financially capable of doing so.

 

Manitoba Experience Stream

This stream helps facilitate immigration for individuals who have current or past experience in Manitoba as either temporary foreign workers or international students. Principal applicants must score at least 60 out of 100 points on the MPNP selection grid. This grid takes into account the following factors:

  • Language proficiency
  • Age
  • Work Experience
  • Education
  • Adaptability

In order to be eligible, applicants must meet one of the following experience criteria:

  • Full-time skilled work experience in Manitoba for at least six months within the past ten years
  • Completion of a post-secondary program (excluding language studies) in Manitoba

International Students must meet the following criteria:

  • Have graduated from a post-secondary program in the province;
  • Have successfully applied for a work permit from Citizenship and Immigration Canada and are currently working in the province;
  • Have received a full-time, long-term job offer from the current employer;
  • Have the training and licensing, work experience, and language ability necessary for permanent employment in the province; and
  • Have the ability and intention to settle permanently in the province.

 

Manitoba Employment

This stream helps facilitate immigration for individuals with long-term, full-time job offers in Manitoba. The job offers must be made after at least six months of continuous full-time employment as temporary workers, or after completion of a post-secondary program in the province.

Temporary foreign workers working in any occupation may be eligible under this stream. Temporary workers must meet the following eligibility requirements:

  • Receive an offer of employment from their current employer in Manitoba
  • Possess all necessary qualifications to perform the job in Manitoba
  • Demonstrate sufficient English or French language skills to perform the job in Manitoba
  • Demonstrate that they do not have a stronger connection to a province other than Manitoba
  • Provide a Settlement Plan in which they demonstrate the intention to live, work, and become established in Manitoba

In addition, temporary foreign workers should note that:

  • People who are work permit exempt may not apply under this stream
  • All applicants must demonstrate sufficient settlement funds, but current income may be counted towards these funds.
  • International students from other provinces are eligible under this stream only if they have been working for their Manitoba employer for at least one year.

International graduates of Manitoba post-secondary institutions may be eligible to apply through this stream if they receive a job offer from a Manitoba employer with whom they have been working for at least six months. International graduates must also meet the following requirements:

  • Attended an authorized education or training program at a public, or registered private vocational, post-secondary institution in Manitoba
    • The program must have been full-time and at least one academic year in length.
    • Possess a diploma, degree, or certificate as the result of this program
  • Demonstrate that they do not have a stronger connection to a province other than Manitoba
  • Provide a Settlement Plan in which they demonstrate the intention to live, work, and become established in Manitoba

Demonstrate sufficient English or French language skills to perform the job in Manitoba

In addition, international students should note that:

  • They must receive a post-graduation work permit within 60 days of completing their program of study in Canada
  • Graduates who settle in Manitoba are eligible for a 60 per cent tuition rebate
  • Students outside Manitoba are not eligible to apply under this stream.

#OET #OccupationalEnglistTest #HealthcareProfessionals #AustraliaVisa #DIBP #WorkVisa #StudentVisa #Subclass570

#OET #OccupationalEnglistTest #HealthcareProfessionals #AustraliaVisa #DIBP #WorkVisa #StudentVisa #Subclass570

The Occupational English Test (also known as OET) is an international English language test for the healthcare sector. It assesses the language communication skills of healthcare professionals who wish to register and practise in an English-speaking environment.

OET is available for the following 12 professions: dentistry, dietetics, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physiotherapy, podiatry, radiography, speech pathology, and veterinary science.

OET is recognised by regulatory healthcare bodies and councils in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. Many organisations, including hospitals, universities and colleges, are using OET as proof of a candidate’s ability to communicate effectively in a demanding healthcare environment.[4] In addition, OET is recognised by the Australian Department of Immigration and Border Protection for a number of visa categories, including work and student visas.[5]

Each recognising organisation determines which grade results mean that candidates meet the language competency standards to function in their profession. A full list of regulatory organisations which accept OET can be seen on the official website.

Format
OET provides a valid and reliable assessment of all four language skills – Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking – with an emphasis on communication in medical and health professional settings. OET consists of four sub-tests:

Listening (approximately 50 minutes)
Reading (60 minutes)
Writing (45 minutes)
Speaking (approximately 20 minutes).[6]
Listening

The listening test consists of two parts. In Part A, candidates listen to a simulated consultation (dialogue) between a professional and a patient and are required to take notes under headings. In Part B, candidates listen to a health professional giving a short talk on a health-related topic and are required to complete a range of open-ended and fixed-choice questions.[7]

Reading

The reading test consists of two parts. In Part A, lasting 15 minutes, candidates are asked to skim read 3 or 4 short texts and complete a summary paragraph by filling in the missing words. It is designed to test the reader’s ability to scan texts within a time limit, source information from multiple texts, and synthesise information. In Part B, lasting 45 minutes, candidates are asked to read two passages on a general healthcare topic and answer 8–10 multiple choice questions for each text. It is designed to test the reader’s ability to read and comprehend longer texts.[8]

Writing

The writing paper asks candidates to write a letter, usually a letter of referral. For some professions a different type of letter is required, e.g. a letter of transfer or discharge, or a letter to advise a patient, carer or group. Candidates are given case notes which must be included in their letter.[9]

Speaking

The speaking test is in the form of one-to-one conversations with an interlocutor. It starts with a short warm-up interview about the candidate’s professional background. This is followed by two role plays. Candidates have 2–3 minutes to prepare for each role play. Role plays last about five minutes and are based on typical interactions between a health professional and a patient. The candidate adopts their usual professional role (e.g. as a nurse) and the interviewer plays a patient or sometimes a relative or carer. For veterinary science the interviewer is the owner or carer of the animal.[10]

Scoring[edit]
Each of the four sub-tests that make up OET are graded A to E, where A is the highest grade and E is the lowest. There is no overall grade.

OET grade Description of ability
A Very high level of performance
B High level of performance, i.e. able to use English with fluency and accuracy adequate for professional needs
C Good level of performance; however, not acceptable to a range of health and medical councils
D Moderate level of performance; requires improvement
E Low level of performance; requires considerable improvement

Listening and reading

There is no fixed score-to-grade link for the listening and reading tests. Grade boundaries are continually reset because different test materials are used at each administration. A mean average of the percentage of candidates in each grade for the writing and speaking tests is applied to the spread of performances on the listening and reading tests to establish the grade boundaries.

Writing and speaking

In writing and speaking, the score is generated through statistical analysis of the two sets of scores from two independent assessors. This is converted, following established practice, to the final grade

Survey says foreign students highly satisfied with studies in Australia

Survey says foreign students highly satisfied with studies in Australia

The Australian government has just released the findings of its International Student Survey 2014, which focused on measuring students’ satisfaction levels as well as comparing these to international benchmarks obtained via the International Student Barometer (ISB) survey.

The scope of the research included international students studying at Australian universities, vocational and training institutes (VET), and the English language training sector (ELICOS); a total of 55,609 students responded. A separate survey covered international students aged 16 years or over studying in Australian secondary schools in years 11 and 12.

High satisfaction overall

Nearly nine in ten (88%) international students studying at the tertiary level in Australia reported being satisfied with their experience in 2014, virtually matching the levels recorded for the previous two survey periods (87% in 2012 and 86% in 2010).

Eight in ten (80%) international students studying in VET institutes said Australia had been their first choice of destination for study abroad; this fell slightly among students in higher education, ELICOS, and the schools sector (73%, 72%, and 71% respectively). The most important motivations for students choosing Australia are the reputation of Australian qualifications, quality of education providers, and overall education system; personal safety; and the quality of teaching and research (all above 90%).

Nearly nine in ten tertiary students reported being satisfied with their experience of living in Australia (89%) as well as their study experience (87%). The schools survey found higher levels of satisfaction than in 2012 (82% are satisfied with their overall study experience, compared to 74% in 2012).

In general, Australian international students’ positive experiences remain stable from previous years, and they are similar to the levels of satisfaction found among international students in other countries surveyed by the ISB. The study makes a point of noting that the high levels of satisfaction of international students studying in Australia’s ELICOS sector (90% satisfied) is important given that students often move on from ELICOS to further programmes of study in Australia.

Good news from the schools sector

More good news stems from the country’s schools sector, where 81% reported satisfaction with their living experience in Australia, up significantly from 72% in 2012. 77% consider the teaching they are experiencing is good or very good, up from 69% in 2012. Moreover, 76% of school respondents said they wished to move on to tertiary-level study in Australia.

Room for improvement

The importance of students getting work experience and feeling prepared to enter the workforce is a constant theme in ICEF Monitor articles; across the world, schools are realising that it is ever more crucial to establish industry linkages for their programmes.

While Australia’s education providers do not come in much below international benchmarks for satisfaction with work experience and careers advice, they are nevertheless slightly below on this measure overall (78% compared to the international benchmark of 80%).

Satisfaction in these areas slips further, albeit only slightly, in relation to international benchmarks in some sectors:

  • Australian higher education: 65% and 68% for work experience and careers advice, respectively, compared to the international benchmarks of 68% and 72%.
  • Australian VET: 78% each for work experience and careers advice compared to the international benchmark of 80% for both measures.

In terms of postgraduate responses, satisfaction was slightly higher than international benchmarks for “managing research” and “topic selection” but significantly lower for “opportunities to teach” (64% versus the international benchmark of 75%).

Satisfaction was high for the following measures, across sectors:

  • Learning supports;
  • Technology;
  • Learning alongside students from other cultures.

Smooth pathways

Importantly for the overall health of international education in Australia, international students studying in one sector reported strong levels of enthusiasm for transferring to another one. Four in ten (41%) VET students, nearly half in ELICOS (47%), and 80% of school students indicated they were on a pathway to further study. We wrote recently about the key role the ELICOS sector in particular plays in funneling international students through the Australian education system.

Feeling welcome

The survey found high levels of satisfaction among international students arriving in Australia and getting set up (as gauged by such measures as support for getting a bank account, finance office assistance, formal welcome, Internet access, support of friends).

There is room for improvement in making international students feel integrated and comfortable once they are studying. Australian schools came in under international benchmarks for satisfaction on such measures as host friends (69% versus the ISB international benchmark of 74%), local orientation (77% versus ISB 86%), and meeting staff (79% versus ISB 91%).

Living in Australia

International students indicated high levels of satisfaction (around the 90% mark) for the experience of living in Australia (gauged by such measures as campus environment, “good place to be,” eco-friendly, safety), but were less happy about the cost of living, the ability to earn money, the cost of accommodation, and financial support. Satisfaction with these affordability-related measures was in some cases as low as 49%.

It is important to note that Australian schools did not fare badly regarding affordability concerns relative to other countries surveyed by the ISB; but in many cases, students’ satisfaction levels in these areas fell by various degrees compared to what they were in previous years.

The decreases in satisfaction on these fronts is particularly important when we look at the VET sector, since Australia’s VET programmes are so popular among foreign students. Satisfaction with financial support fell from 77% in 2012 to 69% in 2014, and satisfaction with the ability to earn money fell from 75% in 2012 to 68% in 2014 among students in the VET sector.

The report notes that affordability issues are particularly acute among students in the higher education and VET sectors because of the longer duration of their programmes compared to relatively short ELICOS courses.

Nearly nine in ten (87%) international VET students said that being able to work while studying was a factor when deciding where to study, and 76% of higher education students said the same.

Increased use of agents

In 2010, just over a quarter of higher education respondents said agents had been a major influence in their choice of where to study in Australia. By 2012 that percentage had risen to 44%. In 2014, it rose to 50%.

Students recorded high levels of satisfaction with agents; for example, 90% reported that the service they received was good or very good.

Use of agents increased across other sectors as well, and in general, students said agents had been more influential than friends or relatives in their choice of school.

Motivations for study

The top three reasons international students chose Australia varied according to sector:

  • For higher education, it was reputation of chosen qualification (95%), reputation of chosen institution (94%), and reputation of Australia’s education system (93%);
  • Reasons were similar among students in the VET sector, and personal safety and the reputation of the qualification were equally as high for VET students;
  • For ELICOS, it was teaching quality (97%), personal safety and security (95%), and reputation of the institution (92%);
  • For schools, it was improve English (65%); gain experience living and studying in another country and/or culture (62%); and improve chances of entering a good university in Australia (53%).

A commitment to improvement

Overall, international students studying in various types of institutions are reporting high levels of satisfaction regarding their study abroad experience in Australia.

Improvements in two areas could see Australia boost its competitiveness still further:

  1. Providing more career guidance and opportunities for students to work while studying;
  2. Increasing a commitment to industry linkages and, where possible, job opportunities.

Of the findings, Chief Executive of Universities Australia, Belinda Robinson, commented:

“Australia’s reputation as a world-leader in international education is built on a commitment to delivering an education experience of the highest quality – and as this survey shows, this isn’t going unnoticed.”

But Ms Robinson also noted that there would be ongoing commitment to improving international students’ experiences still further:

“Whilst our universities are proud of Australia’s enviable reputation for quality, their commitment to continuous improvement is essential for maintaining the global high regard we enjoy.”

Why students should opt to study in Streamlined Visa Provider (SVP) – Australia:

Why students should opt to study in Streamlined Visa Provider (SVP) education provider in Australia:

Stream Lined Visa Processing has come a long way since it was initially announced on March 24th 2012 for prospective international students with a Confirmation of Enrolment (CoE) from only a few participating university at bachelor, masters or doctoral degree level or for a non-award university student exchange or study abroad programme.

Major sign shown by the Australian Immigration of opening up student visas to Australia was On March 22nd 2014 when streamlined student visa processing arrangements were extended to certain eligible non-university higher education providers for bachelor, masters or doctoral degree level courses.

The November 23rd 2014 streamlined student visa processing arrangements were extended to certain eligible vocational education and training (VET) and higher education providers for advanced diploma level courses.
Applicants that are eligible for streamlined student visa processing generally have reduced documentation requirements, similar to those that apply under Assessment Level 1, regardless of their country of origin.

Most importantly third party sponsors are allowed to financially sponsor the student visa application under SVP.

Eligibility
You must meet all of the following requirements to be eligible for streamlined student visa processing:

At the time of making your student visa application, you must have a Confirmation of Enrollment (CoE) with an education provider participating in the streamlined visa processing arrangements for a:
Advanced diploma
Bachelor degree
Masters degree
Doctoral degree
Non-award university student exchange program
Non-award study abroad program.
If you enroll in multiple courses, all your preliminary courses must be at an education provider participating in the streamlined visa processing arrangements or a nominated educational business partner of that provider.
Note: If you combine a non-award university student exchange or study abroad program course with any preliminary course(s) you will not be eligible for streamlined visa processing and will be assessed according to the applicable assessment level.
If you are sponsored by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade or the Australian Department of Defense on a Foreign Affairs or Defense Sector visa (subclass 576), you are not eligible for streamlined visa processing.

Study in ATMC + Federation University/Charles Darwin University – Australia

About ATMC:

ATMC educational journey started as a series of teaching institutions in major cities of the Indian subcontinent that provided a pathway for students into higher educational facilities.

The ATMC have collaborated with two recognized regional universities with proven strengths, in Information Technology and Business Studies

Federation University Australia (FedUni):

v  It is Australia’s only regional multi-sector university.

v  It is the third oldest site of higher learning in Australia, and offer secondary schooling, technical and further education (TAFE), higher education, and research opportunities.

v  It has seven campuses, located at the Mt Helen, SMB and Camp Street campuses in Ballarat and at Horsham, Stawell Gippsland and Ararat.

 

Charles Darwin University (CDU):

v  CDU has approximately 22,000 students, enrolled in VET, Higher Education and Research courses throughout Australia

v  It has 7 campuses across the Northern Territory, Melbourne and Sydney.

v  More than eight hundred international students from 55 different countries study at the Casuarinas campus in Darwin.

Programmes Offered at ATMC – Federation University

 

The Business School. Location Options : Sydney / Melbourne
Course 2015
Annual Fee
(AUD)
2016
Annual Fee
(AUD)
Duration (Years)
Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) 20,000 24,000 3 years
Master of Business Administration 21,400 26,800 2 Years
Master of Professional Accounting 21,400 26,800 2 Years

v

School of IT & MS Location Options : Sydney / Melbourne
Course 2015
Annual Fee
(AUD)
2016
Annual Fee
(AUD)
Duration (Years)
Bachelor of Information Technology 20,000 23,000 3 years
Bachelor of Information Technology (Business Systems) 20,000 23,000 3 years
Bachelor of Technology 20,000 23,000 3 years
Master of Technology (Enterprise Systems) 21,400 24,800 2 Years
Master of Technology (Software Engineering) 21,400 24,800 2 Years

 

Additional Programmes Offered at Melbourne Campus Only:

 

Business School

Bachelor of Business 20,000 24,000 3 years

 

School of IT & MS

Bachelor of Information Technology (Computer Games) 20,000 23,000 3 years
Bachelor of Information Technology (Software Engineering) 20,000 23,000 3 Years

 

Programmes Offered at ATMC –Charles Darwin University

Faculty, Law, Education, Business and Arts Location : Melbourne
Course 2015
Annual Fee
(AUD)
2016
Annual Fee
(AUD)
Duration (Years)
Bachelor of Accounting 17,600 TBC * 3 years
Bachelor of Commerce 17,600 TBC * 3 years
Master of Accounting (Professional Practice) 21,440 TBC * 2 years
Master of Business Administration (Professional Practice) 21,440 TBC * 2 Years

 

v Campuses:

Melbourne, Sydney, Geelong and Malaysia

 

v Job Placement Assistance

ATMC provides job placement assistance in which complete guidance is provided in terms of resume preparation, mock interviews, etc.

 

v Intakes:

March, July and Nov

v IELTS*: Minimum requirement is 6.0 Bands overall not less than 5.5 

Apply for Australia PR/Immigration through SkillSelect

AUSTRALIA GUIDE FOR APPLYING EXPRESSION OF INTEREST UNDER SKILLSELECT WITH IS MANDATORY IF YOU ARE APPLYING FOR SKILLED MIGRATION UNDER VARIOUS CATEGORIES OF VISAS AND WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS

SkillSelect is a major change to how Australia manages its skilled migration program.

SkillSelect will ensure the skilled migration program is based on the economic needs of Australia. The Australian Government will be able to manage who is able to apply for skilled migration, when they are able to apply and in what numbers, on the basis of this need.

As a result, the Department of Immigration and Citizenship expects to significantly reduce the time taken to process a visa application.

SkillSelect will also help address regional skill shortages. SkillSelect allows intending migrants to indicate they are willing to live and work in regional Australia. This will be of particular benefit to employers experiencing regional skill shortages and state and territory governments attempting to settle migrants in regional Australia.

The pass mark for the new SkillSelect visa subclasses 189, 190 and 489 will be 60 points. Intending migrants will first need to submit an expression of interest (EOI) and be invited to make an application for these visas.

SkillSelect is a new electronic service for managing the skilled migration program. Intending migrants without an employer sponsor wanting to live and work in Australia will need to complete an online EOI, then based on claims of their skills and attributes, will be allocated a score against the points test. SkillSelect will rank intending migrant’s scores against other EOIs.

The highest ranking migrants across a broad range of occupations may be invited to apply for a skilled visa.

The previous pass mark was appropriate in the context of the skilled migration reforms, with a greater emphasis on employer-sponsored skilled migration and managing a growing pipeline of unsponsored skilled migration applications.

The pass mark for existing general skilled migration subclasses 175, 176, 475, 487, 885 and 886 will remain at 65 points.

The pass mark for the new SkillSelect visas will encourage a broader range of people with the skills and attributes needed in Australia to register their interest in migration.
Skilled Workers Permanent Visa Options

SkillSelect is an online service that enables skilled workers and business people interested in migrating to Australia to record their details to be considered for a skilled visa through an Expression of Interest (EOI). People can be found and nominated for skilled visas by Australian employers or state and territory governments, or they may be invited by the Australian Government to lodge a visa application.

SkillSelect was implemented on 1 July 2012. All intending migrants interested in the independent skilled, family sponsored skilled, state or territory sponsored skilled, or business innovation and investment visa programs will be required to submit an EOI and receive an invitation in order to lodge a visa application.

SkillSelect—Assisting Employers to Find Skilled Workers from Around the World

SkillSelect helps Australian employers find skilled workers who want to migrate to Australia. It will allow employers to quickly and easily identify and contact skilled workers to fill skill shortages.

People wanting to migrate as a skilled worker to Australia first have to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) with their skills and experiences. On their EOI, they can indicate an interest in employer sponsorship and the states and territories of Australia where they are willing to live and work. They will also be able to indicate if they are willing to work outside capital cities, and in regional areas.

What do I need to search SkillSelect?

Employers can search SkillSelect using a range of criteria such as the skilled worker’s occupation, qualifications or English language ability. Employers will be able to view details of skilled workers and then make contact with them to discuss sponsorship and employment.

Employers will need an AUSKey to use SkillSelect.

Australian businesses can register for an AUSKey to securely and conveniently access a range of government online services. To obtain an AUSKey or find out more, visit the AUSKey website.

If you are one of the more than 800 000 existing AUSKey users, you are ready to use SkillSelect.

What happens after I identify a potential skilled worker?

If you find a potential skilled worker you can contact them within SkillSelect. You can submit a contact request in SkillSelect to the skilled worker with your contact details. The skilled worker can then contact you to discuss employment opportunities.

Following contact with the skilled worker, you may decide to sponsor and employ them. Information about how to sponsor a skilled worker to migrate to Australia is available on our website – Skilled Workers.

Do I have to use SkillSelect to sponsor a skilled worker?

No. Employers who identify people through their own selection processes will still be able to sponsor them without the skilled worker submitting an EOI in SkillSelect.

What are the advantages of using SkillSelect?

Employers will benefit from using SkillSelect as it will enable them to quickly and easily identify potential skilled workers with the essential skills and attributes needed. This will reduce overseas advertising and recruitment costs to businesses, and assist in resolving skills shortages.

Another benefit of SkillSelect is the ability to address regional skill shortages. SkillSelect allows skilled workers to indicate whether they are willing to live and work in regional Australia. Employers can search SkillSelect and find skilled workers who have indicated a willingness to work in specific regional areas.
Skilled Independent (subclass 189) visa

Permanent visa for skilled workers who are not sponsored by a state/territory, employer or family member.
Allows visa holder to live and work anywhere in Australia.
Allows certain family members to be added before the application is decided.

Requirements

You might be eligible to apply for this visa if invited. When you receive a letter of invitation, you must also have:

nominated an occupation that is on the relevant skilled occupation list
obtained a suitable skills assessment for that occupation
not yet turned 50 years of age
achieved the score specified in your letter of invitation based on the factors in the points test
at least competent English

Skilled – Nominated (subclass 190) visa

Permanent visa for skilled workers who are nominated by a state or territory government.
Allows visa holder to live and work anywhere in Australia.
Allows certain family members to be added before the application is decided.

Requirements

You might be eligible to apply for this visa if you were invited. When you receive a letter of invitation, you must also have:

nominated an occupation that is on the relevant skilled occupation list
obtained a suitable skills assessment for that occupation
not yet turned 50 years of age
achieved the score specified in your letter of invitation based on the factors in the points test
at least competent English
been nominated by an Australian state or territory government agency.

Skilled – Nominated or Sponsored (Provisional) (subclass 489) visa

Provisional visa for skilled workers who are nominated by a state/territory government or an eligible relative.
Valid up to four years.
Requires visa holder to live and work in a specified regional area.
Allows for the adding of certain family members as secondary applicants.
Pathway visa to permanent regional residence visa 887.

Requirements

Invited Pathway

You might be eligible to apply for this visa if invited. When you receive a letter of invitation, you must also have:

been nominated by an Australian State or Territory government agency or sponsored by an eligible relative living in a designated area
nominated an occupation that is on the relevant skilled occupations list
a suitable skills assessment for that occupation
not yet turned 50 years of age
achieved the score specified in your letter of invitation based on the factors in the points test
at least competent English

Extended Stay Pathway

You can also apply for this visa if you hold a provisional visa in subclass 496, 495, 487 or 475.
Skilled Regional visa (subclass 887)

This is a permanent visa for people who have lived and worked in specified areas of regional Australia.
Requirements

You might be able to get this visa if you:

are in Australia
hold a
Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 489)
Skilled Independent Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 495)
Skilled Designated Area Sponsored (Provisional) visa (subclass 496)
Skilled Regional Sponsored visa (subclass 475 or 487)
or
Bridging visa A or Bridging visa B after applying for a subclass 495, 487 or 489 visa
have lived in a specified regional area of Australia for at least two years
have worked full time in a specified regional area for at least one year
meet health and character requirements.

Express Entry 10th Draw on 12th June 2015 | CRS declined to 482

Ministerial Instructions respecting invitations to apply for permanent residence under the Express Entry system #10 – June 12, 2015

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 10.3 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, gives the annexed Ministerial Instructions Respecting Invitations to Apply for Permanent Residence under the Express Entry System (June 12, 2015).

Ottawa, June 12, 2015

CHRIS ALEXANDER
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

MINISTERIAL INSTRUCTIONS RESPECTING INVITATIONS TO APPLY FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE UNDER THE EXPRESS ENTRY SYSTEM (JUNE 12, 2015)

Determination — number of invitations

1. (1) For the purposes of paragraph 10.2(1)(b) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the number of invitations that may be issued during the period beginning on June 12, 2015 and ending on June 13, 2015 is 1,501.

Required rank

(2) Foreign nationals who, on June 12, 2015 at 23:59:55 UTC, have been assigned a total of 482 points or more under the Comprehensive Ranking System that is set out in the Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Express Entry System, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on December 1, 2014 and as amended from time to time, occupy the rank required to be invited to make an application for permanent residence.